Five years on, Israelis see few benefits from major gas deal

JERUSALEM (AP) — Five years after Israel signed a landmark agreement to develop large offshore gas fields over the objections of antitrust authorities, environmentalists and consumer advocates, ordinary Israelis have yet to see the windfall promised by the government.

The deal has chiseled away at the monopoly held by Houston-based Noble Energy and Israel’s Delek Group, which discovered and developed the fields, bringing prices down. The country is on track to phase out coal and derive nearly all its electricity from cleaner-burning gas and solar power by 2025, and is exporting gas to neighboring Egypt and Jordan.

But the financial benefits have yet to trickle down to Israeli consumers, who continue to pay stubbornly high electricity costs even as oil and gas prices have plunged in recent years.

As the scramble for natural gas creates new alliances and rivalries across the eastern Mediterranean, Israel’s experience shows that while big gas

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The UK’s health system plans to slash greenhouse gas emissions

The UK’s National Health Service released a sweeping plan today to become the first national health system to eliminate nearly all of its planet-heating greenhouse gases. By 2040, it plans to gut all of the emissions it’s directly and indirectly responsible for. That includes pollution from its facilities, electricity use, vehicles, and supply chains for medicines and medical devices.

Health care is responsible for a hefty chunk of greenhouse gases. The National Health Service pumps out between four to five percent of England’s carbon emissions. Globally, the health care sectors in 36 countries with the largest economies accounted for more than 4 percent of worldwide carbon dioxide pollution — more than aviation or shipping.

Getting rid of all that pollution will play a huge role in slowing down climate change. It will also help the UK meet its

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Investors Extracted $400 Million From a Hospital Chain That Sometimes Couldn’t Pay for Medical Supplies or Gas for Ambulances

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In the decade since Leonard Green & Partners, a private equity firm based in Los Angeles, bought control of a hospital company named Prospect Medical Holdings for $205 million, the owners have done handsomely.

Leonard Green extracted $400 million in dividends and fees for itself and investors in its fund — not from profits, but by loading up the company with debt. Prospect CEO Sam Lee, who owns about 20% of the chain, made $128 million while expanding the company from five hospitals in California to 17 across the country. A second executive with an ownership stake took home $94 million.

The deal hasn’t worked out quite as well for Prospect’s patients, many of whom have low incomes. (The company says

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