SMA discusses mental health, racial issues at Fires Conference | Article

By Marie PihulicOctober 1, 2020

Sergeant Major of the Army Michael Grinston discussed tough issues in the ranks and offered ways to maneuver through. He spoke to a live and tuned-in audience Sept. 30 for the 2020 Fires Conference.Grinston discussed how the "My Squad" mentality of connection to those on your Army team, and with family and friends is important. He also explained how being an expert in any particular field means first being an expert Soldier. He said those two fundamentals will eliminate most of the problems the Army is facing.Later in the discussion he was asked the best way to reduce the stigma of going to behavioral health.“We haven’t convinced you at the junior leader level that it’s OK. I’m going to say it again, it’s OK to go to behavioral health,” stressed Grinston.He said the Army is looking into ways to normalize seeing a mental health

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As fires and floods wreak havoc on health, new climate center seeks solutions

For the past month, record-breaking wildfires have torched millions of acres from the Mexican border well into Canada, their smoke producing air so toxic that millions of people remained indoors for days on end while many visited hospitals because of respiratory distress.

Last week, Hurricane Sally left a trail of watery devastation in Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle, even as more storms brewed offshore.

All of that on top of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has killed nearly 1 million people worldwide.

The timing couldn’t have been better for the opening this month of the Center for Healthy Climate Solutions at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health.

Its mission is to work with policymakers and community groups to help safeguard human health against the ravages of climate change. The center was founded on the premise that the long-feared effects of climate change

Read More

As Fires And Floods Wreak Havoc On Health, New UCLA Climate Center Seeks Solutions

For the past month, record-breaking wildfires have torched millions of acres from the Mexican border well into Canada, their smoke producing air so toxic that millions of people remained indoors for days on end while many visited hospitals because of respiratory distress.

Last week, Hurricane Sally left a trail of watery devastation in Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle, even as four other storms brewed offshore.

All of that on top of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has killed nearly 1 million people worldwide.

The timing couldn’t have been better for the opening this month of the Center for Healthy Climate Solutions at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health.

Its mission is to work with policymakers and community groups to help safeguard human health against the ravages of climate change. The center was founded on the premise that the long-feared effects of climate change are already here and must be met

Read More