How to Eliminate Abdominal Fat

  • According to a review published in the journal Advances in Nutrition, combining aerobic exercise and strength training can help decrease abdominal fat.
  • Having excess abdominal fat can increase your risk of health issues such as heart attack and stroke.

    If you ask a trainer how to lose fat, some swear by strength training, while others may suggest an aerobic plan like running. Fortunately, there’s no need to pick a side: New research concludes that both kinds of workouts work, especially if they join forces.

    A review published in the journal Advances in Nutrition looked at 43 studies focusing on training styles and their effects. Researchers found that although aerobic exercise tends to produce slightly greater efficacy in decreasing abdominal fat, the biggest change comes when it is combined with resistance training.

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    There’s an important reason to knock down fat in

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    Fairview restructuring to eliminate 900 jobs, dramatically change health services in St. Paul

    At MPR, Matt Sepic says, “Fairview Health Services said Monday it will close two hospitals in St. Paul as part of a major restructuring. Bethesda Hospital near the Capitol will be leased to Ramsey County to be used as a homeless shelter. St. Joseph’s downtown will become a ‘community hub for health and wellness.’ The major restructuring will eliminate about 900 positions. Fairview said it lost $163 million in the first six months of this year … .”

    In the Pioneer Press, Frederick Melo writes: “Struggling under the weight of pandemic-era financial losses and other industry challenges long in the making, one of the state’s largest healthcare networks will dramatically upend services in St. Paul and beyond, effective almost immediately. M Health Fairview on Monday announced a shake-up that will permanently change the face of Bethesda Rehabilitation Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul, shutter 16

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    To protect America’s health infrastructure, eliminate budget neutrality

    In policy and in health care, the threat of unexpected consequences is real and potentially life-threatening. As obstetrician-gynecologists observe Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month this September, we encourage policymakers and health policy experts to recognize that COVID-19 and government payment cuts are impacting our patients in ways we could not have previously imagined — and that existing budget neutrality laws are exacerbating the problem.

    Approximately 100,000 women are diagnosed with some form of gynecologic cancer — cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal or vulvar — in the United States every year. All women are at risk for gynecologic cancer, and most of us will or already know someone who has been personally affected by it. 

    The global pandemic has had a significant effect on diagnosis and treatment of gynecologic cancer. For months, many OB-GYNs, including gynecologic oncologists, across the country were forced to delay cancer screenings, diagnostic tests and surgeries to avoid spread

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    Trump promises to preserve Obamacare protections he’s trying to eliminate

    President Trump announced Thursday that he would seek to guarantee health care coverage for Americans with preexisting conditions, a protection that is already part of the Affordable Care Act his administration is seeking to repeal.

    “The historic action I’m taking today includes the first-ever executive order to affirm it is the official policy of the United States government to protect patients with preexisting conditions,” Trump said at an event in Charlotte, N.C., where he signed an executive order that he claimed would improve health care in the U.S. 

    Under the ACA, which was passed under former President Barack Obama, Americans with preexisting health conditions cannot be denied health coverage by insurers. Trump’s new executive order, meanwhile, amounts to a pledge and comes after he has repeatedly attempted to gut current health care law. 

    On a call earlier in the day, White House officials said that Trump’s “protections” for preexisting

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    Dr. Fauci cautions that a vaccine won’t eliminate the need for masks and public health measures

    Dr. Anthony Fauci said Thursday that even an effective Covid-19 vaccine won’t replace the need for other public health measures, such as wearing a mask, social distancing and washing hands.



    A server cleans a table in an outdoor area at a restaurant during Clemson University's first home football game in Clemson, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control released the state's daily coronavirus numbers Friday showing another milestone surpassed during the outbreak: More than 3,000 deaths. Photographer: Micah Green/Bloomberg via Getty Images


    © Micah Green/Bloomberg/Getty Images
    A server cleans a table in an outdoor area at a restaurant during Clemson University’s first home football game in Clemson, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control released the state’s daily coronavirus numbers Friday showing another milestone surpassed during the outbreak: More than 3,000 deaths. Photographer: Micah Green/Bloomberg via Getty Images

    Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the vaccine will not be 100% effective and taken by 100% of the population — which means there still will be room for Covid-19 to spread.

    “It is not going to eliminate the need to be prudent and careful with

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    Democrats Warn Trump’s Supreme Court Nominee Could Eliminate Health Care for Millions

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., holds a press briefing on the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, outside the Capitol in Washington on Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    WASHINGTON (CN) — One week after Americans head to the polls in November to decide the next president, the Supreme Court in the midst of a global pandemic will hear the Trump administration’s challenge to the Affordable Care Act. 

    But with President Donald Trump set to shift the high court to a 6-3 conservative majority, Senate Democrats warned Wednesday that millions of Americans’ health care hangs in the balance as a feverish nomination process kicks off. 

    “The courts are the lynchpin in the Republicans’ anti-health care and anti-choice agenda,” Senator Tammy Baldwin told reporters. 

    If the high court overturns the ACA, around 135 million Americans with pre-existing conditions could lose protections under the landmark statute. 

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