A Canadian spin studio followed public health guidelines. But 61 people still caught the covid-19.

Now, despite appearing to have complied with public health regulations, at least 61 people linked to the studio have tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

“They had done all sorts of things to remove the potential for spread,” Richardson told reporters. “Unfortunately, gyms are a higher-risk place because of the fact that generally people are taking off their masks, they’re breathing at a higher rate.”

Although Hamilton requires masks to be worn in most public settings, the law includes an exemption for anyone “actively engaged in an athletic or fitness activity.” In keeping with that policy, the studio, SPINCO, allowed riders to remove their masks once clipped into their bikes, and told them to cover up again before dismounting.

In a recent Instagram post, SPINCO’s owners said that they had been “hesitant” to reopen after getting the green light in July, and would not resume classes “until it is safe

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Newt Gingrich: Trump and public health system have saved 2 million lives in coronavirus pandemic

In the first two debates of the 2020 general election presidential contest, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., have claimed that President Trump is personally responsible for the now more than 215,000 Americans who have perished from COVID-19. 

This is factually wrong, disingenuous, immoral, and disrespectful to the hundreds of thousands of Americans who are working every day to defeat the coronavirus and save lives. It completely ignores the real, successful Trump administration efforts to save lives.

It glosses over the Democratic leaders who have presided over the most devastating losses — New York and New Jersey combined account for nearly one-quarter (23 percent) of all American deaths, according to Tuesday’s U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention figures. Finally, it only serves to sow more fear and discord among Americans. 

INGRAHAM: TRUMP CORONAVIRUS RESPONSE ‘VINDICATED’ BY EUROPEAN ECONOMIES’ ‘TOTAL DISASTERS’

The truth is that President

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COVID 19 Brings New Urgency to Health Outreach in NC Latino Community / Public News Service

Latinos and Black Americans comprise 55% of U.S. coronavirus cases, nearly double their population makeup, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data released in June. (Adobe Stock)

October 14, 2020

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As the coronavirus continues to affect North Carolina’s Latino communities, outreach workers are providing public health information, in Spanish and culturally relevant to this growing population.

Hector Salgado, community impact director for the American Heart Association in Charlotte, was spearheading an effort to raise awareness about heart health and blood-pressure monitoring among Latinos when the pandemic hit. With help from the Mecklenburg County Public Health Department and Blue Cross/Blue Shield, he said, the program pivoted to COVID-19 prevention. As the crisis worsened, Salgado said, he began to notice what he described as rampant misinformation in the Latino community.

“And those resources are not reflected,” he said. “I went to the farmer’s market and I saw

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Public Health talks other COVID-19 testing options following temporary Alliant Energy Center site closure, slowdown

MADISON, Wis. – Following a temporary closure and slowdown at the Alliant Energy Center’s COVID-19 testing site Tuesday afternoon, Public Health Madison & Dane County recommended other options for those seeking tests that day.

In general, the health agency is asking people to consider the time, place and reason they’re getting tested.

“A lot of people do think the Alliant Energy Center is the first place to get tested,” Director of Testing Ken Van Horn said. “We always know that the first day of the week is a busy day, then today we had the added complication of our electronic registration system just didn’t work for about the first hour we were here today, and that caused a pretty big backup.”

PHMDC staff had to use a backup paper registration system

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Austin Public Health launches hotline for COVID-19 services

AUSTIN (KXAN) — The Austin Public Health department has launched a hotline for high-risk workers who need assistance due to the coronavirus, according to a Tuesday press release.

The hotline will provide information and referral services such legal case management, applying for unemployment and one-time financial assistance, according to APH. It will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Fridays in any language until mid-December.

“We are proud to work as a community to launch this hotline that will provide a variety of services for high-risk workers in our community,” said public health director Stephanie Hayden in the press release. “It is an important step to assisting our vulnerable community members in a way that is helpful to them. We worked with many partners and agencies to figure out the best way to set up this service in a manner that is most useful and convenient for

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Coronavirus Hotline Launched By Austin Public Health

AUSTIN, TX — Austin Public Health has launched a high-risk worker hotline to promote the safety and well-being of the vulnerable workers in the community, officials said Tuesday.

The hotline, which is operated by Austin Voices for Education and Youth, provides information and referral services for front line staff who need assistance due to COVID-19. These referral services, to organizations such as Austin Area Urban League, Worker’s Defense Project and Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid, include legal case management, assistance applying for unemployment, and one-time financial assistance.

“We are proud to work as a community to launch this hotline that will provide a variety of services for high-risk workers in our community,” Austin Public Health Director Stephanie Hayden said in a prepared statement. “It is an important step to assisting our vulnerable community members in a way that is helpful to them. We worked with many partners and agencies to

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Health Department director: Public needs to keep up testing in order to help stop spread of COVID-19

Dr. Martha Buchanan said authorities suspect the “underlying level” of the virus is greater than what’s reflected by current testing.

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee — Knox County’s health director suspects people infected with COVID-19 are skipping getting a test, resulting in the silent spread of the highly contagious virus.

Hospitalizations among residents are up to 70 – an all-time high since the pandemic broke out.

Knox County also reported three new deaths Tuesday, raising the total to 89 since March.

Dr. Martha Buchanan, Knox County Health Department director, said area hospitals are “very concerned” about the rise in hospitalizations. They confer regularly to track how the virus ebbs and flows in the community.

Buchanan said she suspects people infected or exposed to the virus just aren’t getting tested, either because they don’t want to have to isolate for an extended amount of time or don’t want to self-quarantine in case they’ve been

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Public invited to address disparities among Black community in Washtenaw County

PITTSFIELD TOWNSHIP, MI — Activists and public officials will gather to discuss disparities among the Black community in Washtenaw County.

Activists will focus on five key areas at the ” Getting Real About Race” event, including housing, employment, education, health care and the criminal justice system in the county. It will run from 2-6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 17 at Lillie Park, 4365 Platt Road in Ann Arbor. Anyone interested is encouraged to register online.

“It’s one thing to know there’s a problem but there’s a whole other element to put some solutions in place. In Washtenaw County, we’ve been protesting, we have people of all different races coming together. While marching is definitely a part of it, we wanted individuals to know there’s another layer of work that needs to be done,” said Trische Duckworth, founder and executive director of Survivors Speak, a nonprofit leading the event.

Policing is

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Ramsey County promotes public health director to deputy county manager

The director of St. Paul-Ramsey County Public Health, Kathy Hedin, has been promoted to the position of deputy county manager of Health and Wellness, Ramsey County officials announced Tuesday.



a group of people looking at a laptop: Dana Janowiak, left, a public health nurse, and Kathy Hedin, an interim public health director, both with St. Paul Ramsey County Public Health Department, set up a computer at Vadnais Sports Center Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019. Ramsey County and the Minnesota Department of Health are hosting information sessions for Water Gremlin employees and their families, including testing for blood lead levels and employment services. Water Gremlin, a White Bear Township plant that makes lead fishing sinkers and battery terminals, was closed Monday after officials learned that 12 children of employees were exposed to lead, brought into their homes accidentally. (Jean Pieri / Pioneer Press)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
Dana Janowiak, left, a public health nurse, and Kathy Hedin, an interim public health director, both with St. Paul Ramsey County Public Health Department, set up a computer at Vadnais Sports Center Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019. Ramsey County and the Minnesota Department of Health are hosting information sessions for Water Gremlin employees and their families, including testing for blood lead levels and employment services. Water Gremlin, a White Bear Township plant that makes lead fishing sinkers and battery terminals, was closed Monday after officials learned that 12 children of employees were exposed to lead, brought into their homes accidentally. (Jean Pieri / Pioneer Press)



a person wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Kathy Hedin, deputy county manager of health and wellness


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
Kathy Hedin, deputy

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Trump’s rapid recovery from Covid-19, while welcome, ‘amplifies’ public misunderstanding of disease

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during a House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing in Washington, D.C.

Erin Scot | Pool | Reuters

Health officials have struggled to convey the seriousness of Covid-19 to many Americans. President Trump’s rapid recovery from the disease, while welcome by all, makes the challenge even more difficult, Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases acknowledged.

Trump’s quick bounce-back from his infection will likely underscore the mistaken belief some people have that the disease does not present significant health risks, Fauci said in an interview with STAT.

“We’re all glad that the president of the United States did not suffer any significant consequences of it,” Fauci said. “But … because he is such a visible figure, it amplifies some of that misunderstanding that people have that it’s a benign disease and

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