Pandemic puts global progress against tuberculosis at risk: WHO

LONDON (Reuters) – The COVID-19 pandemic is derailing global efforts to tackle tuberculosis (TB), the world’s deadliest infectious disease, with cases likely to rise without urgent action and investment, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday.

The WHO’s annual TB report found that tuberculosis killed some 1.4 million people in 2019, little changed from the 1.5 million deaths it caused in 2018. It warned that many countries are not on track to meet targets for successfully diagnosing and treating cases to try to stop the disease’s spread.

Disruptions in services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have led to major setbacks to TB programmes, the report found. In many countries, human, financial and other resources have been reallocated from TB to the COVID-19 response.

“Accelerated action is urgently needed worldwide if we are to meet our targets,” the WHO’s director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement with the report.

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Newt Gingrich: Trump and public health system have saved 2 million lives in coronavirus pandemic

In the first two debates of the 2020 general election presidential contest, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., have claimed that President Trump is personally responsible for the now more than 215,000 Americans who have perished from COVID-19. 

This is factually wrong, disingenuous, immoral, and disrespectful to the hundreds of thousands of Americans who are working every day to defeat the coronavirus and save lives. It completely ignores the real, successful Trump administration efforts to save lives.

It glosses over the Democratic leaders who have presided over the most devastating losses — New York and New Jersey combined account for nearly one-quarter (23 percent) of all American deaths, according to Tuesday’s U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention figures. Finally, it only serves to sow more fear and discord among Americans. 

INGRAHAM: TRUMP CORONAVIRUS RESPONSE ‘VINDICATED’ BY EUROPEAN ECONOMIES’ ‘TOTAL DISASTERS’

The truth is that President

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Which states had the best pandemic response?

For this story, reporters interviewed a wide range of health researchers, public officials and academic experts to ask them which states were standouts in their management of the pandemic. What we heard repeatedly were lessons culled from a handful of states that others could follow.

We’ve distilled their insights into three categories that represent the greatest challenges states are facing: fighting the virus, managing the economic fallout and reopening schools.

FIGHTING THE VIRUS

Leading the way in the rural Northeast

Few states have a record as unblemished as Vermont.

The odds could have been stacked against the state. The virus arrived in Vermont during the first wave sweeping the country. It shares borders with some of the hardest-hit states and has the third-oldest population in the country.

But Vermont swiftly flattened its initial wave and has since gone weeks at a time

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Global Pandemic Disrupts Final Clubs’ Recruitment Plans | News

COVID-19 has disrupted all aspects of Harvard life — including the efforts of the College’s most prestigious social groups to induct hopeful sophomores.

This semester, twelve final clubs on campus are not holding punch — the process by which final clubs recruit students each fall — due to the global health crisis, according to members of each club, who spoke with The Crimson on the condition of anonymity to divulge internal decisions.

The clubs not moving forward with punch include the Bee Club, the Spee Club, the IC Club, the Delphic Club, the Fly Club, the Owl Club, the Porcellian Club, the Phoenix S.K. Club, the Fox Club, the Sablière Society, La Vie Club, and the Exister Society.

The Crimson was unable to confirm the punch plans of the A.D. Club and the Pleiades Society — the only other two final clubs on campus.

Serena G. Pellegrino ’23, who said

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Annual Binational Health Week continues amid pandemic

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, Santa Clara County all this month is keeping alive its annual effort to help address health disparities experienced by Latinx people in the region.

The 16th annual Binational Health Week features a series of in-person events with safety precautions and online informational sessions that include drive-up resource fairs and webinars on checking and controlling blood pressure. There was also a free COVID-19 testing and face covering giveaway at the Children’s Discovery Museum in San Jose over the weekend.

  • SAN JOSE, CA – OCTOBER 10: Myrna Ash, right, receives a nasal swab from Ingrid Rodriguez with the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center during a free COVID-19 testing and flu shot event held at the Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose in San Jose, Calif., on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020. The County of Santa Clara Public Health Department partnering with multiple organizations held the free event as part

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Wellness Home Design Tips For Weight Management During The Pandemic

Hundreds of headlines blare daily warnings about the dreaded “Covid 19” pounds packed on during these long pandemic months. Americans are locked out of their local gyms and yoga studios, locked down in their homes, and locked away from friends and family members for support. What isn’t locked down are the refrigerator and pantry, and comfort food eating is on the rise. What impact is this having on your health, and what can you do about it?

Weighing In

First, the good news: “Much like the myth of the ‘Freshman 15,’ which has been disproven through numerous studies, the ‘Covid 19’ phenomenon is more myth than reality,” declares Jennifer Lombardi, a certified eating disorder psychotherapist at Kaiser Permanente’s Eating Disorder Intensive Outpatient Program in Sacramento.  That doesn’t mean

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Beyond the Stigma: Mental health challenges at college during a pandemic (Commentary)

Jim Malatras has been the chancellor of the State University of New York system since August 2020. From July 2019 until his appointment as chancellor, he was president of SUNY’s Empire State College.

There is often a lot of pressure and anxiety that comes with being a college student. While mental health issues among college students are not new, the Covid-19 pandemic is exacerbating them. In a study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in late June, 63% of 18-to-24-year-olds reported experiencing symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the prevalence of depression among graduate and professional students is two times higher in 2020 compared to 2019.

But like the great diversity of our students at one of our 64 campuses across the state, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Institutions must enlist health professionals in their community, maximize touchpoints and support layers, mobilize young people who want to

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COVID-19 Health Innovation Collaborative Attracts Ideas from Across U.S. to Address Health Pandemic Challenges

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — GuideWell Mutual Holding Corporation (GuideWell), the parent to a family of forward-thinking companies focused on transforming health care, announced 13 health-tech companies from across the nation will showcase solutions that address some of the major challenges of the current health pandemic today at the GuideWell COVID-19 Health Innovation Collaborative Showcase. A virtual substance abuse support system and an AI-powered COVID-19 symptom attestation platform are among the concepts and prototypes that will be featured.

All of the ideas focus on increasing the scope and scale of resources to reduce the complex stress factors COVID-19 is having on our country’s health care system. 

“Overcoming the health care challenges associated with COVID-19 requires out-of-the-box thinking from some of the brightest minds,” said Camille Harrison, senior vice president and chief operating officer of GuideWell Commercial Markets and GuideWell Innovation. “It is more imperative than ever

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Kaiser Permanente Creates Social Health Playbook for COVID-19 Pandemic

OAKLAND, Calif., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Kaiser Permanente, the nation’s largest integrated nonprofit health care system, has created guidance that can be widely adopted across the health care industry for assessing COVID-19 patients’ need for social resources that will allow them to safely recover and reduce community spread of the virus.

The Kaiser Permanente COVID-19 Social Health Playbook provides clinical care teams with guidance and tools for screening patients for social needs, connecting them to help, and following up to ensure their needs are met. The initial release of the playbook has a strong focus on addressing COVID-19 patients’ social needs to improve their health outcomes and to prevent further transmission of the virus. It is publicly available as a free resource for care providers across the industry.

Kaiser Permanente has already broadened the scope of its care and services to address crucial factors that affect people’s health,

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How the pandemic is widening the financial health gap

Over two-thirds of Americans are financially unhealthy, with millions facing “extreme financial hardship,” according to the U.S. Financial Health Pulse Trends Report, released today. And as the stock market continues to strengthen, the average American is still struggling, with unemployment rates still far above pre-pandemic highs and another round of coronavirus stimulus seemingly far off. 

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“50 years ago, when wealth was more evenly distributed, the stock market fluctuations and performance might have been more reflective of how real people were faring. But given the significant disparities in wealth and the fact that a significant percentage of Americans don’t actually own any stock, it really doesn’t tell us very much.” Jennifer Tescher, president and CEO of the Financial Health Network, said. “This study really gives a picture of what people’s real financial lives look like.”

Though the study showed that 33% of Americans—4% more than in 2019—are financially healthy,

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