Wellness Expert James Hill Says Healthy Is More Than Weight Loss

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James Hill says that COVID-19 has exposed how the concept of wellness is not well established in the United States. Photo courtesy of James Hill.

For decades, James Hill, PhD, the chair of the nutrition sciences department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has focused his career on health and wellness.

His resume includes serving as chair of the World Health Organization’s Consultation on Obesity, along with creating guidelines for the treatment and prevention of obesity in the United States.

Today, he’s delivering the keynote address at the Virtual Annual Meeting of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) to discuss the concept of wellness.

He says this notion is tough to pin down and that many Americans are failing in their attempts to manage chronic diseases and overall well-being.

Ahead of his address, Hill took the time to speak with Healthline to discuss how the ongoing

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James Garfield, shot by an assassin, died after White House doctors lied about his recovery

Six weeks later, Garfield was dead. He was 49.

During the summer of 1881, almost 140 years before President Trump acknowledged misleading Americans about the threat posed by the novel coronavirus, the White House fed anxious Americans a daily diet of misleading medical bulletins about Garfield’s condition. The stream of unduly sunny reports came from doctors whose failure to understand basic principles of treating infected wounds would have tragic consequences. With some exceptions, their rose-colored pronouncements were credulously accepted by the press.

The multiple daily reports on Garfield’s condition “became part of everyday life,” even if much of the information was unreliable, according to Richard Menke, a professor at the University of Georgia who has written in the journal Critical Inquiry about the press coverage of Garfield’s struggle to survive. “In fact,” he wrote, “the bulletins were fraudulently optimistic, intended perhaps to reassure Garfield, who often had the newspapers read

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