Mayors neighboring Hartford launch weekly distribution to address regional food insecurity

With food insecurity a persistent concern for families, mayors from three towns neighboring Hartford banded together to launch a weekly food distribution event this month, acknowledging the challenge knows no borders.

Friday marked the first of four such events, measures to bridge the gap for families struggling amid a deadly COVID-19 pandemic that has slowed the economy and left many jobless. By 10 a.m., scores of cars wound through cones in the sprawling Rehoboth Church of God parking lot.

With little pause, cars, SUVs and trucks swept through a gantry of volunteers, who quickly loaded a gallon of milk, a box of fresh produce, meat and dairy products into trunks. Within minutes, the line had quickly diminished as the volunteers stood awaiting new arrivals until the roughly 1,700 boxes of fresh food were gone.

“We find that if we can come together, pool our resources together, it benefits the community,”

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Hunger is nonpartisan, so these initiatives are helping fight food insecurity at polling places on Election Day

Hunger and food insecurity should not stand in the way of Americans who want to exercise their right to vote.

This year, more groups, companies and initiatives have created campaigns to ensure that voters who show up to polling places on Nov. 3 for the 2020 election can do so without fear of going home hungry, missing a meal or being unable to provide food for their families.

From pizza deliveries and food trucks to healthy, gourmet-prepared and catered meals, organizations such as Feed the Polls and Pizza to the Polls are raising money and awareness in order to feed food-insecure voters for free.

PHOTO: People wait in line to cast their vote during early voting at City Hall in Philadelphia on Oct. 7, 2020.

People wait in line to cast their vote during early voting at City Hall in Philadelphia on Oct. 7, 2020.

People wait in line to cast their vote during early voting at City Hall in Philadelphia on Oct. 7, 2020.

Hunger disparities have been heightened due

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Houston Food Banks Battle Skyrocketing Food Insecurity During Pandemic

Local food banks have found new ways to meet increased food insecurity needs during the pandemic, even as Texas has cut a food bank grant almost in half.

Food insecurity has more than doubled in Southeast Texas since March, according to Reginald Young, the chief strategy officer at the Houston Food Bank. Before the pandemic, a large-scale food distribution would serve 300 to 400 families; now, that number has increased to anywhere between 1,500 to 8,000 families at any given time.

The Mamie George food bank center in Richmond, which is run by one of the Houston Food Bank’s partners, Catholic Charities, went from serving roughly a thousand families in a month to serving 2,000 families a day during the pandemic, according to Catholic Charities Communications Director Betsy Ballard.

“It’s humbling to think of how much need is in the community,” Ballard said. “The greatest need is going to be

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Elizabethtown College President McCormick Launches Pantry for Students to Combat Food Insecurity

ELIZABETHTOWN, Pa., Sept. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Recently, Elizabethtown College launched a new initiative in an effort to combat food insecurity. The Blue Jay Pantry, a food pantry located on campus, will be available to the College’s student body.

“We established the Blue Jay Pantry in an effort to minimize the burdens that food insecurities can place on our students,” Elizabethtown College President Cecilia M. McCormick, J.D. said. “It’s estimated that one in five college students have inadequate access to food and we want to put an end to that starting on our campus, and eventually expanding our efforts to the broader community.”

The mission of the pantry is to provide free, non-perishable food items for Elizabethtown College students experiencing hunger and/or having difficulty buying food as well as offering a resource to help students create healthy meals.

Elizabethtown College joins over 700 schools nationwide who operate an

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The Next Front Line of the Coronavirus Pandemic is Food Insecurity

Photo credit: Arturo Olmos
Photo credit: Arturo Olmos

From Esquire

It’s been nearly a year since the virus that changed everything arrived in America, and we’re starting to grasp the impact the coronavirus will have on our bodies and our communities. Before the pandemic, more than 37 million people lived in households that couldn’t afford or didn’t have access to proper amounts of nutritious food. (Keep in mind that households with children, too, are more likely to struggle with food insecurity.) Even if the number was the lowest we’ve seen since the Great Recession, it’s still a horrifying amount that experts believe will grow by as many as 17 million this year due to increasing unemployment rates.

Photo credit: Arturo OlmosPhoto credit: Arturo Olmos
Photo credit: Arturo Olmos

With food insecurity quickly becoming the next frontline of the coronavirus pandemic, food banks and pantries in the United States are now under increased pressure, working to feed as many people (many of

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Food Insecurity And COVID-19 : NPR

New Yorkers in need receive free produce, dry goods and meat at a Food Bank For New York City distribution event on July 30, 2020.

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York


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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York

New Yorkers in need receive free produce, dry goods and meat at a Food Bank For New York City distribution event on July 30, 2020.

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York

Over the summer, like many parents, I was looking to keep my kids productive after their summer jobs and summer sports camps were canceled. Together we came up with a project we’ve undertaken before — collecting books that our well-read and generous neighbors were ready to hand over — and delivering them to students and families who could use something new to read.

But with schools closed, shelters and

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Food Insecurity In The U.S. By The Numbers

With COVID-19 continuing to spread, and millions of Americans still out of work, one of the nation’s most urgent problems has only grown worse: hunger.

In communities across the country, the lines at food pantries are stretching longer and longer, and there’s no clear end in sight. Before the pandemic, the number of families experiencing food insecurity — defined as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life — had been steadily falling. But now, as economic instability and a health crisis takes over, new estimates point to some of the worst rates of food insecurity in the United States in years.

“COVID has just wreaked havoc on so many things: on public health, on economic stability and obviously on food insecurity,” said Luis Guardia, the president of the Food, Research and Action Center.

It’s a crisis that’s testing families, communities and the social safety

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Food Insecurity In The U.S. By The Numbers : NPR

Food Bank For New York City hosts a pop-up food pantry during Hunger Action Month at Lincoln Center on September 24, 2020.

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank for New York City


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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank for New York City

Food Bank For New York City hosts a pop-up food pantry during Hunger Action Month at Lincoln Center on September 24, 2020.

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank for New York City

With COVID-19 continuing to spread, and millions of Americans still out of work, one of the nation’s most urgent problems has only grown worse: hunger.

In communities across the country, the lines at food pantries are stretching longer and longer, and there’s no clear end in sight. Before the pandemic, the number of families experiencing food insecurity — defined as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy

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Housing Insecurity Predictive of Poor Glycemic Control

People with type 2 diabetes who faced housing insecurity had worse glycemic outcomes, a new study found.

Among adults with type 2 diabetes in Northern California, those who had at least one address change in a year showed significantly higher rates of HbA1c over 9% compared with those with no address change (27.2% vs 21.4%, P=0001), reported Tainayah Thomas, PhD, of Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research in Oakland.

In an adjusted model, this equated to a 14% higher relative risk of having an HbA1c above 9% (RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.05-1.25), Thomas explained at the virtual European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2020 meeting.

“Implications of our study are that an address change may be an early warning sign of housing insecurity or stress that could be used to trigger screening or other intervention,” she said during a press conference.

Likewise, those with one or more

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COVID-19: Stanislaus County families facing food insecurity

Kitchen leader Casey Paulino hands out breakfast and lunch meals at Hughson Elementary in Hughson Calif., on Wednesday Sept. 9, 2020.

Kitchen leader Casey Paulino hands out breakfast and lunch meals at Hughson Elementary in Hughson Calif., on Wednesday Sept. 9, 2020.

aalfaro@modbee.com

Read more about food insecurity in Stanislaus County ==> School districts, nonprofits and government officials find ways to feed those in need

Modesto resident Claudia Villagomez and her husband lost their jobs in the farm fields when the pandemic hit, and they haven’t been able to find work.

They were out of money to feed their family. A friend told her about the Salvation Army food bank.

On a blistering hot August day, she backed her small sedan into the refrigerated port at the agency’s food distribution center on Janopaul Lane in South Modesto, where the volunteers filled her trunk with apples, milk and non-perishables.

“It helps a lot,” said Villagomez. “We have four children and my parents.”

Her kids range in age from 2 to

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