Fact: Being Outside Doesn’t Mean You’re Immune to Coronavirus (Even at the White House)

If you think you’re safe from the coronavirus just because you’re outdoors, think again.

While the wind and the large volume of air make the outdoors less risky than being indoors, circumstances matter.

Someone who is infectious can cough or sneeze, or just talk and, if you happen to inhale those respiratory droplets or they plop into your eye, you can get infected. If you shake hands with an infected person and then touch your eyes, nose or mouth, you also run a chance of getting infected. You don’t have to be inhaling an infected person’s air for very long. What matters is the dose.

As an infectious disease doctor, I get a lot of questions from patients about COVID-19 risks. Here are some answers about the risks outdoors.

Doesn’t Wind Make Outside Safer Than Inside?

It’s true that the wind helps disperse respiratory droplets that can carry viruses.

When

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Trump claims he’s immune to COVID-19 and can’t spread it, but Twitter flags tweet

Washington — President Trump declared on Sunday he was ready to return to the campaign trail, despite unanswered questions about his health. The statement came on the eve of a Florida rally meant to kick off his campaign’s stretch run before Election Day.

Twitter later flagged a Trump claim that he’s now immune to COVID-19 and can’t spread it to other people.

Mr. Trump’s  impending return comes after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus — but didn’t say explicitly whether Mr. Trump had tested negative for it. The president insisted he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and added to the unknowns about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Mr. Trump said in an interview on Fox News Channel’s “Sunday Morning Futures.” “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

In a

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Trump says he’s ‘immune’ to COVID. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from COVID-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, COVID-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in

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Trump declares himself ‘immune’ to Covid-19. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative.

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from Covid-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, Covid-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in

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Trump falsely dismisses virus danger: ‘You catch it, you get better, and you’re immune’

The president’s continued effort to minimize the danger comes as more than 211,000 American lives have died from the virus that continues to spread in many parts of the U.S., including inside the White House and within the ranks of his own administration.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump pulls off his protective face mask as he poses atop the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from being hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) treatment, Oct. 5, 2020.

President Donald Trump pulls off his protective face mask as he poses atop the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from being hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center

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SmartyPants Meets the Moment with New Healthy Immunity Formulas for Multifunctional Immune Support

SmartyPants’ Healthy Immunity Daytime and Healthy Immunity Nighttime combine key nutrients like zinc, B6, B12, C and D3 to support your immune system. Healthy Immunity Daytime provides multifunctional immune support to help you power through your day, along with herbals elderberry and echinacea, while Healthy Immunity Nighttime provides the same immune support plus melatonin, to get you to sleep faster, allow you to sleep longer, and help you recharge while you sleep.

The SmartyPants approach to functionals is comprehensive – never single ingredient – relying on the latest science and premium ingredients to deliver an effective solution. Studies show that a major portion of your immune system is located in your gut. In order to keep your immune system working its best, gut health needs to be a top priority in any health routine. SmartyPants Healthy Immunity formulas both include prebiotic beta glucan for clinically-proven immune support and probiotics, along

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Trump’s age, immune system and underlying health problems will chart his battle against covid-19

The president, famously opposed to the medical guidance that Americans wear masks in most circumstances, may have left himself vulnerable to receiving a heavy dose of the coronavirus that has killed at least 207,000 people and infected more than 7.2 million in the United States, according to a Washington Post analysis.

People with underlying health problems also tend to have poorer outcomes. The 74-year-old president weighs 244 pounds, a total that makes him slightly obese, according to information released by the White House after his physical exam in June. He takes a statin for high cholesterol and his blood pressure is slightly elevated.

The most important factor is the president’s age. Human immune systems, which battle the virus, become less effective as we grow older. Even as the overall covid-19 death rate in the United States has declined during the eight months of the pandemic, nearly 80 percent of fatalities

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Elderly hit so hard by COVID-19 because of lower levels of certain immune cells

Elderly people who get COVID-19 have lower levels of important immune cells, which may explain why they are more likely than younger patients to have severe symptoms or die, new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed blood samples from 30 people with mild COVID-19, ranging in age from the mid-20s to late-90s. Compared with healthy people, all of the COVID-19 patients had lower numbers of T cells — which target virus-infected cells — in their blood.

But COVID-19 patients over 80 years of age had fewer T cells than those who were younger, and so-called “killer” T cells in older patients produced lower amounts of cytotoxic molecules that find and kill infected cells, the investigators found.

This age-related difference in immune response may partially explain why older COVID-19 patients have more severe illness, according to the authors of the study published this month in the journal mBio.

“Elderly

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Immune system holds clues to virus reaction

One of COVID-19’s scariest mysteries is why some people are mildly ill or have no symptoms and others rapidly die — and scientists are starting to unravel why.

An international team of researchers found that in some people with severe COVID-19, the body goes rogue and attacks one of its own key immune defenses instead of fighting the coronavirus. Most were men, helping to explain why the virus is hitting men harder than women.

And separate research suggests that children fare better than adults thanks to robust “first responder” immune cells that wane with age.


They’re the latest in a list of studies uncovering multiple features of the immune system’s intricate cascade that can tip the scales between a good or bad outcome. Next up: Figuring out if all these new clues might offer much-needed ways to intervene.

“We have the knowledge and capability of really boosting many aspects of

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8 foods that boost your immune system and can help keep you healthy



a table topped with lots of fruit: Eating leafy green vegetables and red bell peppers can help strengthen your immune system. Crystal Cox/Business Insider


© Crystal Cox/Business Insider
Eating leafy green vegetables and red bell peppers can help strengthen your immune system. Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Foods that can help boost your immune system include citrus fruits, leafy green vegetables, red bell peppers, yogurt, and green tea.
  • Many of these foods contain vitamin C and vitamin A, which are known to help support immune function. 
  • You can also add ginger, garlic, and turmeric to your food to gain additional immune benefits. 
  • This article was reviewed by Jason R. McKnight, MD, MS, a family medicine physician and clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Medicine. 
  • Visit Insider’s Health Reference library for more advice.

The foods you eat can help support your immune system and keep you healthy. 

“What we eat is really central to our overall health, and that includes the immune system,” says Janine Souffront, RDN, a registered dietitian and supervisor of Health

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