As virus surges anew, Milan hospitals under pressure again

MILAN (AP) — Coronavirus infections are surging anew in the northern Italian region where the pandemic first took hold in Europe, putting pressure again on hospitals and health care workers.

At Milan’s San Paolo hospital, a ward dedicated to coronavirus patients and outfitted with breathing machines reopened this weekend, a sign that the city and the surrounding area is entering a new emergency phase of the pandemic.

For the medical personnel who fought the virus in Italy’s hardest-hit region of Lombardy in the spring, the long-predicted resurgence came too soon.


“On a psychological level, I have to say I still have not recovered,’’ said nurse Cristina Settembrese, referring to last March and April when Lombardy accounted for nearly half of the dead and one-third of the nation’s coronavirus cases.

“In the last five days, I am seeing many people who are hospitalized who need breathing support,” Settembrese said. “I am

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Mountain Health hospitals revert to ‘no visitation’ policy | Wc News

HUNTINGTON — Mountain Health Network announced Monday that, as of 6 p.m., its “no visitation” policy will again be in effect for both Cabell Huntington Hospital and St. Mary’s Medical Center due to an increase in community spread of COVID-19.

“This was a difficult decision, as we know the importance family plays in a patient’s recovery. But after considering what was best for our patients and employees, it was a decision we had to make,” said Dr. Hoyt Burdick, chief clinical officer for Mountain Health Network, in a release. “As community spread increases, we must adapt our policies in order to preserve everyone’s safety. We truly appreciate the community’s understanding and cooperation.”

The following restrictions are in place for both hospitals until further notice:

  • No one will be permitted to accompany or visit a patient in the hospital with few exceptions. This restriction also applies to many persons previously considered
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Care providers protest police violence in hospitals after Harbor-UCLA shooting

L.A. County Sheriff's deputies gathered outside Harbor-UCLA Medical Center.
L.A. County sheriff’s deputies meet outside Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, where multiple investigations are underway into a patient who was shot by a deputy last week. (KTLA-TV)

A group of care providers and activists gathered outside Harbor-UCLA Medical Center on Tuesday evening to protest police violence in hospitals after a patient was shot there last week by a Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputy.

“Hospitals are a place where we should be getting care,” said Mark-Anthony Clayton-Johnson, founder of the Frontline Wellness Network, a coalition of care providers working to end mass incarceration. “In that context, there should never be a reason why a law enforcement officer should use lethal force, such as a gun, on our folks.”

Clayton-Johnson, who does not work at the hospital but was scheduled to speak at Tuesday’s event, added: “Sheriffs shouldn’t have any place responding to crises in our hospitals when trained providers are better equipped

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Mountain Health hospitals revert to ‘no visitation’ policy | News

HUNTINGTON — Mountain Health Network announced Monday that, as of 6 p.m., its “no visitation” policy will again be in effect for both Cabell Huntington Hospital and St. Mary’s Medical Center due to an increase in community spread of COVID-19.

“This was a difficult decision, as we know the importance family plays in a patient’s recovery. But after considering what was best for our patients and employees, it was a decision we had to make,” said Dr. Hoyt Burdick, chief clinical officer for Mountain Health Network, in a release. “As community spread increases, we must adapt our policies in order to preserve everyone’s safety. We truly appreciate the community’s understanding and cooperation.”

The following restrictions are in place for both hospitals until further notice:

  • No one will be permitted to accompany or visit a patient in the hospital with few exceptions. This restriction also applies to many persons previously considered
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COVID On The Rise In UK As More Patients In Hospitals Than In March

KEY POINTS

  • England’s emergency nightingale hospitals will be used again in the north of the country to provide extra capacity for local health services amid a steep rise in COVID-19 infections, The Guardian reported
  • Jonathan Van Tam, England’s deputy chief medical officer, argued that infection rates are rising fast in northern England due to the fact that the COVID infection rate never dropped as far as it did in the south during the summer
  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson implemented new COVID-19 restrictions for specific England regions, where infection rates are spiking

COVID-19 admissions are rising in the U.K., with a growing number of elderly people needing urgent treatment. According to the Guardian, England’s emergency Nightingale hospitals will be used again in the north of the country to provide extra capacity for local health services amid a steep rise in infections.

Stephen Powis, national medical director of NHS England, said that

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Mountain Health hospitals revert to ‘no visitation’ policy | Coronavirus

HUNTINGTON — Mountain Health Network announced Monday that, as of 6 p.m., its “no visitation” policy will again be in effect for both Cabell Huntington Hospital and St. Mary’s Medical Center due to an increase in community spread of COVID-19.

“This was a difficult decision, as we know the importance family plays in a patient’s recovery. But after considering what was best for our patients and employees, it was a decision we had to make,” said Dr. Hoyt Burdick, chief clinical officer for Mountain Health Network, in a release. “As community spread increases, we must adapt our policies in order to preserve everyone’s safety. We truly appreciate the community’s understanding and cooperation.”

The following restrictions are in place for both hospitals until further notice:

  • No one will be permitted to accompany or visit a patient in the hospital with few exceptions. This restriction also applies to many persons previously considered
Read More

5th Missoula resident dies; some W. Montana hospitals near capacity | Local News

Providence Montana did not address how the hospitals would proceed if ICUs were over capacity and if the hospitals themselves were full.

In an email, Community Medical Center encouraged people to continue social distancing, wearing a mask and avoiding large gatherings.

“As reported by Governor Bullock, cases of COVID-19 continue to increase in our state. With the documented increase in confirmed positive cases, hospitals throughout the state, including ours, have seen an expected increase in hospitalizations over the last several weeks,” said spokesperson Sarah Buszmann in an email.

“At this time, our hospital has adequate capacity to meet patient needs, including in critical care/intensive care. We continually monitor the prevalence of the virus in our community, in addition to evaluating operational capacity and following all necessary protocols, to ensure we are able to meet the vital needs of our patients.

“Beyond our hospital walls, we are working closely with the

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CMS Gives Hospitals 14 Weeks to Start Daily COVID, Flu Reports

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

The federal government is giving hospitals 14 weeks to comply with daily reporting requirements for COVID-19.

Hospitals that fail to meet the requirements will be barred from participating in Medicare and Medicaid, as announced in late August in a final rule.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will send letters on October 7 to all 6200 hospitals that receive reimbursement from the two federal health programs informing them of how well they are doing now, said CMS Administrator Seema Verma on a press call. 

Verma would not give an estimate on how many hospitals are currently not compliant. But Deborah Birx, MD, a member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, said on the call that 86% of hospitals are currently reporting daily.

Federal officials on the call also announced that hospitals would have

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Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare, Leading Hospitals Partner to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injuries

Organizations maintained over 60% drop even amidst COVID-19 pandemic

A collaborative project to address hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPI) has resulted in more than a 60% reduction in a common but preventable issue that claims over 60,000 U.S. lives each year. Led by the Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare, the improvement initiative — including The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Hospital and Memorial Hermann Southeast Hospital — saw these significant reductions sustained even as the COVID-19 pandemic accelerated in the United States.

The project launched to identify solutions to prevent and reduce the rate of pressure injuries, also known as decubitus ulcers or bedsores, in health care facilities after seeing that HAPI were rising nationally. Experts estimate more than 2.5 million patients in U.S. acute-care centers experience pressure ulcers and injuries each year. Because pressure injuries are a significant risk for immobile patients, the country is experiencing a

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The Virus Surges in North Dakota, Filling Hospitals and Testing Attitudes

Around Bismarck, there is a range of responses to the virus; but people are generally left to make their own choices about the potential risks. Some cafes are bursting with maskless patrons and workers. Other businesses have limited their capacities. Around half of the customers in Al’s Barber Shop, near one of the city’s hospitals, wear a mask, Travis Zenker, the owner, said.

All of it should be a personal choice, said Wanda Serr, owner of Little Cottage Cafe, a popular diner where workers do not wear masks.

“If you feel safe, go out and do what you do; if you don’t feel safe, it’s your right to stay home,” she said.

As cases have risen, some officials have tried to press for county-level mask requirements.

“I feel like I’m powerless,” said Renae Moch, public health director for Bismarck-Burleigh Public Health, who said she received insulting and threatening emails and

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