Public health expert: ‘Large gatherings like rallies shouldn’t be happening at this point for any purpose’

The director of the Center for Health Security at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health on Sunday said that the president’s diagnosis with coronavirus was further indication large public events should not be occurring.

“I think there is clear danger in having events where there are many people close together without wearing masks for a long period of time, especially where loud voices are used,” Tom Inglesby said on “Fox News Sunday,” adding “large gatherings like rallies shouldn’t be happening at this point for any purpose.”

Asked about future debates, Inglesby told Fox News’ Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallacePost-debate poll finds Biden with leads in two key states Trump’s performance was a gift to American democracy Chris Wallace: Trump arrived too late to be tested in Ohio before debate, relied on ‘honor system’ MORE that “the vice presidential debates and if there are presidential debates should be virtual.”

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Fitness events happening in Houston include Core Focused Yoga and Run in The Park

Here’s what’s happening Monday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area

Illinois public health officials reported Sunday they had logged 1,604 newly diagnosed cases and 14 additional confirmed deaths of people with COVID-19, raising the statewide tally to 287,930 known cases and 8,601 deaths.



a group of people walking down a street: Abi Carbajal stands in the kindergarten line with her daughter Liani Uribe, 7, who is entering the second grade and Abi's little brother, Jacob Rebollar, 5, who begins kindergarten on the sidewalk outside of Newton Bateman Elementary School in Chicago's Irving Park neighborhood on Sept. 2, 2020.


© Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Abi Carbajal stands in the kindergarten line with her daughter Liani Uribe, 7, who is entering the second grade and Abi’s little brother, Jacob Rebollar, 5, who begins kindergarten on the sidewalk outside of Newton Bateman Elementary School in Chicago’s Irving Park neighborhood on Sept. 2, 2020.



Erika Cardoza, 22, Gustavo Martinez, 22, and their son Eli, 3, get a free COVID-19 test provided by Community Organized Relief Effort (CORE) at "I Grow Chicago" in West Englewood on Aug. 31, 2020.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Erika Cardoza, 22, Gustavo Martinez, 22, and their son Eli, 3, get a free COVID-19 test provided by Community Organized Relief Effort (CORE) at “I Grow Chicago” in West Englewood on Aug. 31, 2020.

Meanwhile, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and labor leaders whose members could bear the brunt of layoffs or furloughs as the city

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Here’s what’s happening Thursday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area

Gov. J.B. Pritzker warned Wednesday the region of northwest Illinois that includes Rockford and Northern Illinois University and borders Wisconsin and Iowa could soon see stricter rules aimed at curbing the spread of coronavirus.



a group of people walking down a street: Abi Carbajal stands in the kindergarten line with her daughter Liani Uribe, 7, who is entering the second grade and Abi's little brother, Jacob Rebollar, 5, who begins kindergarten on the sidewalk outside of Newton Bateman Elementary School in Chicago's Irving Park neighborhood on Sept. 2, 2020.


© Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Abi Carbajal stands in the kindergarten line with her daughter Liani Uribe, 7, who is entering the second grade and Abi’s little brother, Jacob Rebollar, 5, who begins kindergarten on the sidewalk outside of Newton Bateman Elementary School in Chicago’s Irving Park neighborhood on Sept. 2, 2020.

The nine-county region, as defined by Pritzker’s reopening plan, had a 7.5% test positivity rate as of Wednesday, which has climbed “at a concerning rate,” the governor said at a news conference in Chicago.

The governor’s announcement came as Illinois public health officials reported Wednesday they had logged 1,848 newly diagnosed cases and 22 additional confirmed deaths of people with COVID-19,

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