Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death will affect health care

The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has stoked fears over the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Six weeks ahead of Election Day, Democratic leaders of the legislature’s Insurance and Public Health committees portrayed the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a wedge issue in the campaign for General Assembly and in the presidential race unfolding amid a global health pandemic.

Ginsburg’s death Friday means the Supreme Court will have a smaller liberal wing when it hears the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act in November.

“To the voters of Connecticut: Health care is on the ballot,” Rep. Sean Scanlon, D-Guilford, a co-chairman of the Insurance Committee, said Tuesday at a press conference at the State Capitol. “There is a referendum coming soon on what kind of health care we want to see. … If the current president and the current members of

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Trainer of 20 Years Honored Her with Push-Ups Next to Her Casket

Mourners Turn Out in Droves to Pay Last Respects to RBG at Public Viewing in Washington D.C.

Mourners Turn Out in Droves to Pay Last Respects to RBG at Public Viewing in Washington D.C.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s personal trainer of more than 20 years paid tribute to the late justice in the best way he knew how — doing push-ups in front of her casket Friday.

In a video of the touching moment, trainer Bryant Johnson walks up to the casket before respectfully kneeling and doing a handful of push-ups for Ginsburg, who was well-known for the rigorous training regimen she kept, even while battling cancer.

Ginsburg’s flag-draped casket is currently in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall, where she became the first woman and first Jewish person in American history to lie in state. Ginsburg is among 38 people (12 of whom were U.S. Presidents) who have been given the

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What Justice Ginsburg’s Death Means for Health in America

In the midst of a pandemic and with the fate of the Affordable Care Act pending before the Supreme Court, attention should focus on what Justice Ginsburg’s replacement by someone who is likely to be very conservative will mean for health care. Justice Ginsburg was a strong voice and a consistent vote to provide the federal government the power to ensure health insurance for all and especially to protect women’s reproductive health.

The Supreme Court first assessed the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius (2012), a few months before the 2012 presidential election. One aspect of the ACA that was challenged was the so-called “individual mandate,” requiring individuals to purchase health insurance or pay a special tax. The requirement was designed to prevent a downward spiral on the health insurance market if only sick people were enrolled (thus raising the

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Ginsburg’s death exposes fragility of health law protection

People gather at the Supreme Court to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020, in Washington.

People gather at the Supreme Court to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020, in Washington.

AP

With COVID-19 the newest preexisting condition, the Obama-era health law that protects Americans from insurance discrimination is more fragile following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

A week after the presidential election, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on an effort backed by President Donald Trump to strike down the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, in its entirety. Former President Barack Obama’s landmark law bars insurers from turning away people with health problems, or charging them more.

With Ginsburg on the court, there seemed to be little chance the lawsuit championed by conservative-led states could succeed, given that she and four other justices had twice previously voted to uphold important parts of the health law. But that 5-4 majority is gone following Ginsburg’s

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Ginsburg’s death exposes fragility of health law protection

WASHINGTON (AP) — With COVID-19 the newest preexisting condition, the Obama-era health law that protects Americans from insurance discrimination is more fragile following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

A week after the presidential election, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on an effort backed by President Donald Trump to strike down the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, in its entirety. Former President Barack Obama’s landmark law bars insurers from turning away people with health problems, or charging them more.

With Ginsburg on the court, there seemed to be little chance the lawsuit championed by conservative-led states could succeed, given that she and four other justices had twice previously voted to uphold important parts of the health law. But that 5-4 majority is gone following Ginsburg’s death last Friday from complications of metastatic cancer of the pancreas.

Yet it is not at all clear what the court

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What Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death means for key health care issues

The Supreme Court on Friday announced that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died from complications related to cancer, and her passing could have significant implications for some hot-button health care issues currently before the Court—as well as issues the Court could consider in the near future.

How Ginsburg’s death could affect rulings on hot-button health care issues

Ginsburg’s death presents the opportunity for President Trump to add another conservative judge to the Supreme Court, which could affect the way the court will rule for years to come. With Ginsburg, the court had five justices appointed by Republican presidents (Chief Justice John Roberts and Associate Justices Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Clarence Thomas) and four appointed by Democratic presidents (Ginsburg and fellow Associate Justices Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan, and Sonia Sotomayor).

Trump on Saturday said he plans to nominate a woman to replace Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, but

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