Coronavirus could spread ‘uncontrollably,’ Germany warns

A medic administers a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) swab test on a motorist at a drive-thru coronavirus testing center at the Talavera car park in Wuerzburg, Germany, on Monday, Aug. 31, 2020.

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Germany has issued a stark warning over the spread of the coronavirus, with top health officials sounding the alarm over potential further outbreaks in the country.

“The current situation worries me a lot. We don’t know how things will develop over the next few weeks,” Lothar Wieler, head of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases, said on Thursday morning.

“It’s possible that we will see more than 10,000 new cases a day. It’s possible that the virus spreads uncontrollably,” he said, in comments translated by Reuters. He added that only 8% of cases currently seen in Germany were imported from overseas.

Wieler was speaking at a press conference with German

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First Known Rubella Virus Relatives Found In Uganda, Germany

KEY POINTS

  • Scientists discovered two viruses related to the rubella virus in animals
  • The findings suggest that rubella virus possibly originated in animals
  • Researchers are now trying to determine whether the rubella vaccine could be effective in all three viruses

Two research teams have found the first known relatives of the rubella virus. The findings provide clues regarding the origin of the virus, which has remained a mystery for years.

Rubella, also known as German measles, is a contagious disease caused by an airborne virus that has been known to be the only member of its virus family. It had not been found in animals. Although rubella disease was first described in 1814 and the rubella virus was first isolated in 1962, the actual origin of the virus and the disease remained a mystery.

Most people who get infected by the virus experience mild symptoms such as a low-grade fever,

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Germany approves third trial of COVID-19 vaccine candidate

BERLIN (Reuters) – Unlisted biotech firm IDT Biologika has won approval from Germany’s vaccine regulator to become the third German company after BioNTech and CureVac to launch human trials of an experimental coronavirus vaccine in the country.

The trial of the vaccine, which has been developed with the German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), will be conducted on 30 participants aged between 18 and 55 who will receive two vaccinations at four-week intervals.

A larger Phase II trial, which will include elderly volunteers, is planned for the end of this year if the results of the early-stage study show the vaccine is safe and produces an immune response.

Based in Dessau-Rosslau in east Germany, IDT produces viral vaccines for pharmaceutical companies and is assisting in six COVID-19 projects including AstraZeneca’s experimental shot against COVID-19.

Its own so-called viral vector vaccine is based on a modified and harmless smallpox virus that

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Germany has limited its coronavirus death toll, but it hasn’t escaped criticism

  • Germany has been praised for its tackling of the coronavirus pandemic, having managed to keep deaths under 10,000 while its European neighbors have seen much higher fatalities. 
  • But the chief executive of German health-care group Fresenius has warned that the country may have been overly focused on the pandemic, ignoring other areas of business and society that have suffered.



a close up of a person wearing a mask: Doctors in Berlin, Germany.


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Doctors in Berlin, Germany.

Germany has been praised for its tackling of the coronavirus pandemic, having managed to keep deaths under 10,000 while its European neighbors have seen much higher fatalities. 

But the chief executive of German health-care group Fresenius has warned that the country may have been overly focused on the pandemic, ignoring other areas of business and society that have suffered.

“Even though a lot has been done in the right way, my criticism is that we have focused too exclusively on the coronavirus

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The Latest: Germany foreign minister Maas in quarantine

Heiko Maas’ ministry says an initial test on the minister was negative. The ministry says it is working with local authorities to establish whether other people need to take measures.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK

— More virus-related restrictions in store for hard-hit Madrid

— 200,000 dead in the US as Trump vilifies science, prioritizes politics

— India adds 83,347 new coronavirus cases in past 24 hours

— Johnson & Johnson to begin huge study to see if a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine can protect against the virus. It will test 60,000 volunteers in various countries.

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Germany eyes global health ambitions as U.S. steps back

Although the U.S. is an important partner to the WHO, it can be replaced, said David Heymann, an epidemiologist who headed the WHO’s response to SARS in 2003. “Germany has become a very important partner in global health recently and other countries are stepping up as well,” he said shortly after Trump’s announcement.

It’s not just cash that Germany is funneling into global health. It’s also determined to be the voice of reason in shaking up the WHO post-pandemic. A case in point: While Germany and France abandoned talks over an American proposal for reforms at the WHO, they penned their own plan to strengthen the organization.

Pitching for ‘more WHO’

The two nations recently made the pitch for a beefed-up WHO in a blueprint, reported by Reuters last week, that would give the global body more legal powers while boosting mandatory payments from member countries.

Spahn, who has continued

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