Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute Given $3.3M For Mental Health

SAN DIEGO, CA — The Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute was awarded a five-year, $3.3 million grant Monday to study the integration of mental health services in the care of patients with type 1 diabetes.

In 2016, the American Diabetes Association released guidelines for screening and treating patients with diabetes distress — the name given to the often hidden emotional burden that many people experience when managing a demanding chronic disease like diabetes.

Researchers at Scripps Whittier will use the funds from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to launch a large-scale, randomized, controlled clinical trial that will evaluate whether the integration of diabetes distress care with routine medical care results in better management of diabetes and better health-related quality of life.

“Diabetes distress is not a psychological disorder, but rather represents the understandable emotional strain of living with a life-long condition,” said Addie Fortmann, a clinical

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Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute Granted $3.3 Million for Mental Health

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The Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute was awarded a five-year, $3.3 million grant Monday to study the integration of mental health services in the care of patients with type 1 diabetes. Photo courtesy Scripps.org

The Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute was awarded a five-year, $3.3 million grant Monday to study the integration of mental health services in the care of patients with type 1 diabetes.

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In 2016, the American Diabetes Association released guidelines for screening and treating patients with diabetes distress — the name given to the often hidden emotional burden that many people experience when managing a demanding chronic disease like diabetes.

Researchers at Scripps Whittier will use the funds from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to launch a large- scale, randomized, controlled clinical trial that will evaluate whether the integration of

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Mice with diabetes successfully treated with EMFs

Researchers have worked out how to use electromagnetic fields to treat mice with type 2 diabetes.

Scientists have discovered that they can successfully treat type 2 diabetes in mouse models by exposing the rodents to electromagnetic fields.

The research, which appears in the journal Cell Metabolism, opens the door to further studies confirming the findings and exploring whether the therapy could be suitable for use in humans.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 34 million people — approximately 1 in 10 — in the United States have diabetes. Of these individuals, the vast majority have type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when a person’s cells do not react to the hormone insulin properly. Insulin, which the pancreas produces, mediates the ability of a person’s cells to receive blood sugar.

In this situation, a person’s body can tell that their cells are not

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Treatment Reverses Young Man’s Type 1 Diabetes. Will It Last? | Health News

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) — After starting a drug that’s officially approved to treat a type of blood cancer, a young man with type 1 diabetes was able to stop using insulin.

He’s been off insulin since August 2018 — more than two years.

Dr. Lisa Forbes — his doctor and co-author of a letter describing his case in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine — stopped short of calling the drug a cure for type 1 diabetes.

But Forbes, an assistant professor of pediatrics, immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said the patient’s diabetes appears to have been reversed. She hopes it will stay that way as long as he keeps taking the oral medication called ruxolitinib (Jakafi). It’s in a class of medications known as JAK inhibitors.

Whether this drug

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Diabetes Outreach teams up to offer ‘Better Choices, Better Health’ interactive program | News, Sports, Jobs

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MARQUETTE — Since COVID-19 started, are you having trouble taking care of yourself? Have you gained weight, found yourself frequently eating junk food and sitting in front of the TV or computer? This can be harmful if you have diabetes, kidney disease, heart problems, a physical disability or other lifelong condition.

The National Kidney Foundation of Michigan and the U.P. Diabetes Outreach Network are working together to offer “Better Choices, Better Health,” an online, interactive program that guides you to positive health behaviors for free. You will join a small group of people experiencing similar struggles and trying to create their best life with an ongoing health condition.

The program provides a supportive environment for people who are facing health challenges and trying to make changes. Together, participants find ways to overcome obstacles and celebrate their successes.

New BCBH groups are starting every week. Enrollment is ongoing

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Lohmans’ $4 million donation to fund diabetes center at Daytona’s Halifax Medical Center

ORMOND BEACH — When Lowell Lohman met a few years ago with medical researchers working to find a cure for diabetes, he offered praise for their dedication, but also a suggestion:

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Lohmans’ $4 million donation funds diabetes center at Halifax Health

Jim Abbott
 
| The Daytona Beach News-Journal

ORMOND BEACH — When Lowell Lohman met a few years ago with medical researchers working to find a cure for diabetes, he offered praise for their dedication, but also a suggestion:

“I told them, ‘While you’re searching for it, please make the day-to-day struggle of being a diabetic easier,’” said Lohman, a successful entrepreneur who has been a Type 1 diabetic for 55 years.

Now, Lohman and his wife, Nancy, are making a $4 million donation to support that goal by establishing Lohman Diabetes Center of Excellence at Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach. It is conceived as a one-stop resource center for diabetes patients seeking access to world-class endocrinologists, on-site lab work, educational and lifestyle coaching, the Lohmans said.

“That’s our hope, that it’s a navigation center, a collaborative team approach to diabetes care,” said Nancy Lohman, who joined her husband

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Call to Action for Screening, Early Treatment of Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes derive benefit from earlier detection and treatment, suggests a decade-long follow-up of the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study in General Practice of Intensive Treatment and Complication Prevention in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Identified by Screening (ADDITION-Europe).

“The 10-year follow-up findings support the use of intensive treatment of type 2 diabetes soon after diagnosis and have implications for policy relating to early detection and subsequent management of type 2 diabetes in primary care,” said Simon Griffin, MD.

Griffin, the study lead from the University of Cambridge, UK, presented the findings at the virtual European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting 2020. 

Although the difference in the primary outcome between the intensive treatment and routine care groups favored the former, the difference was not statistically significant.  

Still, “It looks like early intensive treatment of multiple risk factors soon after diagnosis is safe and seems to lower cardiovascular

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Common heartburn meds linked to higher diabetes risk

Often-used drugs called proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, ease heartburn symptoms, but a new study suggests they might also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Chinese researchers drew on information from studies of more than 200,000 U.S. health care professionals and found that regular use of PPIs — such as Aciphex, Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix — was associated with a 24% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The researchers also found that the longer people used the drugs, the higher their odds of diabetes.

“Regular PPI use was likely to be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, particularly for those with prolonged use,” the authors wrote in the report published online this week in the journal Gut.

Jinqiu Yuan, a researcher from the Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China, led the study.

PPIs are available by prescription or over-the-counter to treat acid reflux, peptic ulcers

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Pancreas size, shape can return to normal in diabetes remission, study says

Reversing type 2 diabetes can restore the pancreas to its normal size and shape, a new study finds.

Previous research found that with remission of type 2 diabetes through significant weight loss, natural insulin-production can return to levels similar to people who have never had diabetes.

The new study is the first to show that reversing diabetes can also affect the size and shape of the pancreas, the researchers said.

The study included 64 people with type 2 diabetes and a control group 64 people without diabetes whose pancreas health was monitored for two years. At the start of the study, average pancreas volume was 20% smaller and organ borders were more irregular in people with diabetes than in the control group.

After five months of weight loss, pancreas volume was unchanged in people with diabetes who’d gone into remission — responders — as well as those who had not.

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