Turkey will declare asymptomatic COVID-19 cases as of next week: paper

ISTANBUL (Reuters) – Turkey will start declaring the number of asymptomatic COVID-19 cases from Oct. 15, its health minister said in remarks published on Sunday, following criticism that its disclosure of only symptomatic cases hid the extent of infections.

At the end of July, Turkey changed the wording of its daily coronavirus report to show the number of “patients” instead of “cases” . At a news conference on Sept 30, Koca said that the government was only sharing the number of COVID-19 positive cases with symptoms.

Medics and opposition parties criticised the practice, saying it was aimed at hiding the real scale of the pandemic and was meant to keep the economy moving.

“We will start (releasing all the numbers) on 15th,” Health Minister Fahrettin Koca was quoted as saying in an interview with daily newspaper Hurriyet.

“We will share the cross sectional screening results even though they show no

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Trump says he will refuse to take part in next debate after organizers declare it will be held virtually.

“I’m not gonna waste my time in a virtual debate. That’s not what debating is all about — you sit behind the computer and do a debate, it’s ridiculous. And then they cut you off whenever they want,” Trump said.

In a statement made a few hours later, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said the second debate should be pushed back to Oct. 22, the planned date of the third debate, and insisted that another debate should be held on Oct. 29, five days before the election.

Joe Biden’s deputy campaign manager, Kate Bedingfield, said Biden agreed to the Oct. 22 session but turned down the idea of a later meeting. She said Biden would hold a town hall on Oct. 15 in lieu of the planned debate; ABC News later said it would host the town hall.

Late Thursday, Stepien cited a report by White House doctor Sean Conley

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Cities Declare Racism a Health Crisis, but Some Doubt Impact | Wisconsin News

By SOPHIA TAREEN, Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) — Christy DeGallerie noticed a startling trend in her online group for coronavirus survivors: White patients got medications she’d never heard of, were offered X-rays and their doctors listened to their concerns.

That wasn’t her experience. When the 29-year-old Black woman sought a COVID-19 test at a New York emergency room, a nurse said she didn’t have a fever. DeGallerie appealed to a doctor of color, who told the nurse to check again. It registered 101 degrees.

“We know our pain is questioned and our pain is not real to them,” said DeGallerie, who later started a group for Black COVID-19 survivors. “Getting medical help shouldn’t be discouraging for anyone. It is a discouraging place for Black people.”

Addressing experiences like DeGallerie’s has become a priority for a growing number of local governments, many responding to a pandemic that’s amplified racial disparities and

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