Coronavirus Feels Doubly Dangerous In A Town Haunted By Asbestos : Shots

Frank Fahland, 61, is one of hundreds of Libby, Mont., residents who has an asbestos-related disease. That makes them potentially more vulnerable to complications from COVID-19.

Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau


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Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

Frank Fahland, 61, is one of hundreds of Libby, Mont., residents who has an asbestos-related disease. That makes them potentially more vulnerable to complications from COVID-19.

Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

LIBBY, Mont. — Frank Fahland has spent most days since the pandemic began at the site of his dream house, working to finish a 15-year labor of love while keeping away from town and the people closest to him.

Like thousands of people from Libby and Lincoln County, in the far northwestern corner of Montana, the 61-year-old Fahland has lungs already scarred by years of breathing in the asbestos fibers that have contaminated

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4 Mental Health Myths That Are Seriously Dangerous

Photo credit: Getty Images
Photo credit: Getty Images

From Seventeen

If you start down the rabbit hole that is looking up mental health terms on Google, you’ll realize that there’s a lot of competing and confusing information. If everyone thinks I’m happy, am I not depressed? Do teens only die by suicide because of bullying? If you have some questions that feel unanswered, keep reading. We’re here to debunk some common mental health myths that really need to disappear.

1. If no one notices you’re depressed, you must be fine: FALSE.

Some people are just able to mask it better than others. If you’re continuing to earn A’s, maintaining a social presence, and acting like things are great, that doesn’t mean you’re not depressed. It’s how you feel on the inside that matters most.

2. Dumping a depressed friend is okay: True—and False.

You have to take care of yourself, so if a friendship

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Health experts thrash North Dakota’s new quarantine guidelines: ‘This is highly dangerous’

The new guidelines say that people who came into close contact with a positive case will no longer need to self-quarantine as long as both parties were wearing a mask. The definition of a close contact remains the same — a person who spends at least 15 minutes within 6 feet of someone who tests positive for COVID-19 — but now the state says the close contact no longer needs to quarantine as long as everyone was wearing a mask “consistently and correctly the entire time.”

Though public health officials around the country agree there’s significant evidence that wearing masks curbs the spread of COVID-19, The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead consulted with experts who said it is a step too far to suggest masks will eliminate the need to self-quarantine.

“This is the worst case of pseudoscience I’ve ever seen,” Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and

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Trump is still in a ‘dangerous position’ even though he looks well, a U.S. doctor says

  • There are high hopes that President Donald Trump’s will recover from the coronavirus, but he should not be discharged too soon as Covid-19 can be “very stealthy,” said William Schaffner of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.
  • There are “high hopes” for the president’s recovery, but his age and weight potentially put him at higher risk, he said.
  • Schaffner also said Trump may have been infectious since last Monday and the number of people who were in contact with him without precautions could be “very large.”



Donald Trump sitting at a table in a kitchen: President Donald J. Trump works in his conference room at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for COVID-19 on October 3, 2020 in Bethesda, Maryland.


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President Donald J. Trump works in his conference room at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for COVID-19 on October 3, 2020 in Bethesda, Maryland.

SINGAPORE — There are high hopes that President Donald Trump’s will recover from the coronavirus, but he should not be discharged too soon as Covid-19 can be “very stealthy” and infected patients

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Gottlieb warns of “very dangerous season” for coronavirus as cases rise

Washington — With the number of coronavirus cases continuing to rise as the United States heads into the fall and winter months, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former head of the Food and Drug Administration, warned Sunday the country is “taking a lot of infection into a very dangerous season” for the virus.

“I think that there’s a lot of concern that we could start to see a real upsurge and this is a continuation of a broader trend underway as we head into the colder months,” Gottlieb said on “Face the Nation.” “We were always facing heightened risk of increased spread of coronavirus as we headed into the fall and winter. Now we’re there. We’re starting to see that increase, and we’re taking a lot of infection into a very dangerous season for this virus.”

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the U.S. has surpassed 7 million, and more than

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Alex Berenson: Media focus on coronavirus death count designed to make virus seem more dangerous

The mainstream media continues to focus on total coronavirus deaths, where the United States leads the way, instead of data like per capita and per reported cases, and author and former New York Times reporter Alex Berenson feels it’s simply the latest way to stoke fear.

“For six months, many big media outlets have done everything possible to attempt to spread panic about the coronavirus,” Berenson, who has been an outspoken critic of the way coronavirus is covered, told Fox News.

ALEX BERENSON’S CORONAVIRUS BOOKLET HITS AMAZON AFTER ELON MUSK, OTHERS CALL OUT ONLINE RETAILER FOR ‘CENSORSHIP’

“In March, the crisis was ventilator shortages, which proved to be nonexistent. In May, they hyped the almost nonexistent risk Covid presents to children. Over the summer, they pretended that hospitals in the Sunbelt were near collapse,” Berenson said. “Now they focus relentlessly on a single figure, the death count.”

A recent study

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COVID vs Head, Heart, and Heparin; Afib Screening Flop; Phone Triage Dangerous?

Heparin binds to cells at a site adjacent to ACE2, the portal for SARS-CoV-2 infection, and “potently” blocks the virus, which could open up therapy options. (Cell)

The heightened focus on post-viral effects is what’s really novel about lingering heart damage after COVID-19, a piece in The Atlantic suggests.

Nearly 2% of COVID-19 patients sustain a stroke, with “exceedingly high” 34% in-hospital mortality, a meta-analysis showed. (Neurology)

Opportunistic screening for atrial fibrillation (Afib) in seniors at primary care visits didn’t actually increase the detection rate in a pragmatic randomized trial in the Netherlands. (The BMJ)

Johns Hopkins Hospital turned its interactive gaming room for stroke rehabilitation into a staff decompression space during the COVID-19 lockdown.

Outcomes after MI improved, especially for women, from 2008 to 2017. (Circulation)

Sept. 21 marked the 60th anniversary of the first successful mitral valve prosthesis implant. (

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Dangerous Facts About Performance Enhancing Drugs

Performance enhancing drugs, as the name suggests, are typical drugs that can be taken for increasing one’s performance. These drugs are basically steroids taken by athletes and sportsperson who are genuine professionals. Also, certain other hormonal drugs, including human growth hormone stimulants might also be regarded as performance enhancing drugs.

These enhancers were first used by the Greeks in the ancient past and were ingested by participants of sporting events. But these drugs have however been recognized as a threat and since the 20th century, certain technologies have been developed for testing and screening athletes on a regular basis to find the presence of such drugs in their blood stream. These enhancers have been banned since then.

Performance enhancing drugs- the phrase, is just used to refer to certain anabolic steroids or their relevant precursors in general, but the world of anti-doping organizations have a broader description for these drugs. … Read More

Why Baby Walkers Are Dangerous

What makes mobile walkers dangerous? Experts say their very design helps kids move easily – often much too easily for them to sustain serious injuries.

“About three million baby walkers are sold in the United States each year. They are generally used in the 2- to 4-month period after a child can sit up and before he can walk without assistance. But by giving a child added height, a walker suddenly brings him within reach of hazards such as boiling pots, electric irons and unprotected electrical cords. And kids in walkers travel so fast – three or four feet a second – that even the most attentive parents may not be able to avert disaster,” said Diana Willensky in American Health magazine.

“Babies in walkers plummet downstairs, turn over in walkers that are snagged by cords, door thresholds, and carpet edges, roll themselves against hot wood stoves and heaters, fall … Read More