Pandemic-related job cuts have led 14.6M in U.S. to lose insurance

Up to 7.7 million U.S. workers lost jobs with employer-sponsored health insurance during the coronavirus pandemic, and 6.9 million of their dependents also lost coverage, a new study finds.

Workers in manufacturing, retail, accommodation and food services were especially hard-hit by job losses, but unequally impacted by losses in insurance coverage.

Manufacturing accounted for 12% of unemployed workers in June. But because the sector has one of the highest rates of employer-sponsored coverage at 66%, it accounted for a bigger loss of jobs with insurance — 18% — and 19% of potential coverage loss when dependents are included.

Nearly 3.3 million workers in accommodation and food services had lost their jobs as of June — 30% of the industry’s workforce. But only 25% of workers in the sector had employer-sponsored insurance before the pandemic. Seven percent lost jobs with employer-provided coverage.

The situation was similar in the retail sector. Retail

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Study: Restricting promotions of sweet foods cuts sugar, not profits

Limiting marketing of high-sugar foods in supermarkets doesn’t cut into store profits, but it may improve public health, Australian researchers report.

Price promotions, end-of-aisle displays and putting products at eye level can stimulate sales. Ending these practices reduced purchase of sugar-sweetened drinks and candy in participating stores by the equivalent to nearly two tons of sugar, the researchers said. These included foods and drinks with added sugars, as well as natural sugar in honey, syrups and fruit juices.

The reductions in soft drink and candy purchases were particularly large, researchers said. Even so, profits were not affected, they added.

The study, published Oct. 7 in The Lancet Planetary Health, ran for 12 weeks and focused on 20 randomly selected stores in rural Australia. Some stores restricted promotion of sugary foods, others did not.

“Our novel study is the first to show that limiting [promotional] activities can also have an effect

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Restricting Promotions of Sweet Foods Cuts Sugar, Not Profits: Study | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Limiting marketing of high-sugar foods in supermarkets doesn’t cut into store profits, but it may improve public health, Australian researchers report.

Price promotions, end-of-aisle displays and putting products at eye level can stimulate sales. Ending these practices reduced purchase of sugar-sweetened drinks and candy in participating stores by the equivalent to nearly two tons of sugar, the researchers said. These included foods and drinks with added sugars, as well as natural sugar in honey, syrups and fruit juices.

The reductions in soft drink and candy purchases were particularly large, researchers said. Even so, profits were not affected, they added.

The study, published Oct. 7 in The Lancet Planetary Health, ran for 12 weeks and focused on 20 randomly selected stores in rural Australia. Some stores restricted promotion of sugary foods, others did not.

“Our novel study

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Health and education spending is at record levels. This budget should have gone further on tax cuts | The Canberra Times

news, federal-politics, simon cowan, centre for independent studies, federal budget, budget 2020, canberra times

The biggest story of the 2020 budget is not, surprisingly, the 12-figure record deficit. It is not the looming trillion dollars in debt. And it is certainly not any supposed unfairness. It’s the loss of a once-in-a-decade chance to shift the economic trajectory of the budget. In normal times, the budget imposes practical limits on government spending. Government can never do everything it wants, because to do so would result in massive deficits, and the public still looks askance at unfunded spending, despite persistent efforts by progressives to undermine this sensible instinct. But in a crisis, different rules apply. Deficits seemingly no longer matter, and governments are free to pursue a broader agenda, for better or worse; as Kevin Rudd did when he found himself unshackled as a result of the Global Financial Crisis. Yet the

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The Cut’s Stella Bugbee to Move Into New Role at New York — New York Media Press Room

Photo: Courtesy of The Cut

Stella Bugbee, SVP and editor-in-chief of the Cut, announced today that she would step down from her current role and become an editor-at-large at New York Magazine. In her new role, she will remain a senior member of the editorial team, working on journalism projects that span the entire print and digital magazine; developing a new flagship podcast alongside editorial director for audio Hanna Rosin; and working closely with editor-in-chief David Haskell on shaping editorial strategy decisions across the magazine, especially to support New York’s digital subscription business. Bugbee will continue as an executive producer of The Cut podcast and write a regular column about culture, fashion, and politics.

Today, Vox Media kicks off a search for a new editor to lead the Cut into its next chapter.

Since taking over the Cut in 2012, Bugbee helped shape it into a leading women’s media

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Actors’ Equity Association Slams Cuts to Live Theater Actors’ Health Plan

Union president says she is “deeply frustrated” that cuts were made without study into how it affects actors of color and those with lower wages

The Actors’ Equity Association, which represents actors and stage managers in live theater, is upset with the changes made by the Equity League to the stage actors’ health plan in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The changes will increase the minimum number of weeks that actors will have to work per year to qualify for the health plan. Currently, members who work 11 weeks qualify for six months of coverage, and 19 weeks earns a year of coverage.

As the plan is jointly managed by trustees from both the union and employers, Association President Kate Shindle and the union’s council voted in favor of a resolution directing union trustees to withdraw support from the changes and to postpone any public announcement regarding the health plan

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Actors’ Equity Association Slams Cuts to Live Theatre Actors’ Health Plan

The Actors’ Equity Association, which represents actors and stage managers in live theatre, is upset with the changes made by the Equity-League to the stage actors’ health plan in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The changes will increase the minimum number of weeks that actors will have to work per year to qualify for the health plan. Currently, members who work 11 weeks qualify for six months of coverage, and 19 weeks earns a year of coverage. As the plan is jointly managed by trustees from both the union and employers, Association President Kate Shindle and the union’s council voted in favor of a resolution directing union trustees to withdraw support from the changes and to postpone any public announcement regarding the health plan until further studies could be performed. Also Read: How TV Animation Survived Mid-Pandemic: Zoom, Puppeteers and Voice Actors in Closets Instead, the Equity-League Health Fund announced

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Medicare cuts threaten the livelihood of academic health centers

Last month, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed a rule that will cut Medicare payments for nearly all surgical procedures starting January 1, 2021. In some cases, surgeons will see up to 9% reductions in reimbursement for care. Cutting payments means less money for university medical centers like mine that fund critical clinical research, and now is hardly the time to be cutting money for medical research.

Academic hospitals are the backbone of the medical community. In addition to caring for patients, our hospitals provide education, mentoring, training, and a host of other essential services that don’t wind up on a balance sheet at the end of the year.

Every year, CMS makes cuts to Medicare payments that have a very substantial impact on our day-to-day operations, making it more difficult to deliver care to our patients and provide high-level education to medical students, residents, fellows, and

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JP Morgan’s Jamie Dimon on taxing the rich, Donald Trump’s tax cuts

J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon

Getty Images

SINGAPORE — J.P. Morgan Chase’s Chief Executive Jamie Dimon said he’s not against higher taxes on the rich, but a wealth tax is not the way to do it.

“A wealth tax is almost impossible to do,” he told CNBC-TV18 at the J.P. Morgan India summit on Tuesday when he was asked whether he’s in favor of such a proposal put forth by several Democrats.

“I’m not against having higher tax on the wealthy. But I think that you do that through their income as opposed to, you know, calculate wealth which becomes extremely complicated, legalistic, bureaucratic, regulatory, and people find a million ways around it. I would just tax income,” he said, suggesting that it’s harder to cheat on such a tax because income is “given.” 

The wealthy in the U.S. have started preparing for tax increases that are likely to

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Drug-therapy combo cuts breast cancer recurrence risk by 25%, Eli Lilly announces

Eli Lilly and Company on Sunday announced positive results in the fight against breast cancer.

A drug called Verzenio, also known as abemaciclib, in combination with adjuvant endocrine therapy, was said to “significantly” reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence by 25% for those with a common subtype of breast cancer. The combo treatment also lowered the risk of developing metastatic disease by 28%, with the highest reduction rates to the liver and bone.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. The subtype at hand is called hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) high risk early breast cancer. Per separate research, around 70% of breast cancers are HR+, HER2-, the most common subtype, and 30% of people diagnosed with this subtype face the risk of recurring cancer, and possibly incurable metastatic disease.

BREAST CANCER: WHAT YOU

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