Infection Control Problems Persist in Nursing Homes During COVID


The new analysis draws on self-reported data from nursing homes collected by the federal government over four weeks from late August to late September. While some states fared much worse than others, all 50 states and the District of Columbia had one or more nursing homes that reported inadequate PPE supply, staff shortages, staff infections and resident cases. Forty-seven states reported at least one COVID-19 death among residents.

The analysis found that more than 28,000 residents tested positive for COVID-19 during the four-week reporting period, and more than 5,200 residents died, showing that the virus is still raging in nursing homes. More than 84,000 long-term care residents and staff have died since January, and more than 500,000 residents and staff have contracted the disease, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s tally, accounting for roughly 40 percent of the national death toll. Long-term care providers include assisted living, adult day care

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COVID Cases Climbing in 36 States | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Coronavirus outbreaks in the Midwest and Western United States have driven the national case count to its highest level since August, fueling fears of what the coming winter will mean for the country.

COVID-19 cases are starting to climb in 36 states, including parts of the Northeast, which is starting to backslide after months of progress, The New York Times reported. More than 820 new deaths and more than 54,500 new cases were announced across the country on Tuesday, the newspaper said. Idaho and Wisconsin set single-day records for new cases.

About 50,000 new cases are being reported each day in the United States for the week ending Monday, the Times reported. That is still less than in late July, when the country was seeing more than 66,000 cases each day.

But the trajectory

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Council Rock North Shuts Down Athletics Amid Rising COVID Cases

NEWTOWN, PA — All athletics and activity programs for Council Rock North High School students are shut down until further notice, Principal Susan C. McCarthy told parents in an email Tuesday afternoon.

The move comes one day after the high school decided to cancel in-person classes for the week after three students reportedly tested positive for COVID-19.

Superintendent Robert Fraser’s decision to close the school went against the advice of Bucks County Health Director David Damsker, who did not recommend closing school.

The health department will only recommend closing a school when there is a clear indication that the district’s health and safety plan isn’t working, Damsker told Patch, and there’s no evidence at this point that transmission is happening within schools.

“School closures are very disruptive and don’t help stop people from getting sick outside of school,” Damsker said. “If people continue to have parties and gather, closing school

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Summit, Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine to Develop Saliva Tests for COVID, Head & Neck Cancer

AURORA, Colo., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Summit Biolabs, Inc., an early-stage molecular diagnostics company specializing in saliva-based testing for COVID-19 and head & neck cancer, and the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine (CCPM) at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus announced today a broad strategic collaboration involving research, development and commercialization of saliva liquid-biopsy tests for early cancer detection and diagnosis of COVID-19 and other viral contagions.

The CCPM holds one of the largest research biobanks in the United States with clinical data from more than 8.7 million de-identified patient records and plans to integrate the data with personalized genomic information.

“This partnership brings two innovative programs together to optimize COVID testing at a time when it’s desperately needed,” says Kathleen Barnes, Ph.D., Professor and Director of CCPM at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “Collaborations like this are crucial in moving research forward and

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UCD, Morehouse leaders link health equity, social justice, coronavirus, covid

Your access to walkable spaces, the fresh food options you have and ultimately your life expectancy will largely be determined by where you live, but to understand why and to improve people’s lives, you have to go beyond geography.

That’s the message that Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice, the dean of Atlanta’s Morehouse School of Medicine and a Harvard University-trained physician, conveyed to faculty, staff and students at UC Davis Health in a Facebook forum marking October as Global Diversity Month.

“We’ve figured out that just going into a community and telling people what they should be doing is not enough to expect that people are going to respond and change their lifestyle,” Montgomery Rice said. “We needed policies that would lead to sustainability, particularly in those areas where we had the lowest life expectancy and that were influenced by psychological barriers.”

She joined Gary

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COVID 19 Brings New Urgency to Health Outreach in NC Latino Community / Public News Service

Latinos and Black Americans comprise 55% of U.S. coronavirus cases, nearly double their population makeup, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data released in June. (Adobe Stock)

October 14, 2020

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As the coronavirus continues to affect North Carolina’s Latino communities, outreach workers are providing public health information, in Spanish and culturally relevant to this growing population.

Hector Salgado, community impact director for the American Heart Association in Charlotte, was spearheading an effort to raise awareness about heart health and blood-pressure monitoring among Latinos when the pandemic hit. With help from the Mecklenburg County Public Health Department and Blue Cross/Blue Shield, he said, the program pivoted to COVID-19 prevention. As the crisis worsened, Salgado said, he began to notice what he described as rampant misinformation in the Latino community.

“And those resources are not reflected,” he said. “I went to the farmer’s market and I saw

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Anthony Fauci warns COVID surge as cases rise in north, weather cools

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Dr. Anthony Fauci says top U.S. college athletic programs and professional sports leagues are managing risks for COVID-19 infections far more professionally than the situation at the White House that led to President Donald Trump’s illness. (Oct. 6)

AP Domestic

The nation’s top infectious disease expert said the United States faces a “difficult situation” with a rise in positive coronavirus tests through a wide swath of northern states as the weather cools. 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the share of positive coronavirus tests is increasing in the Northwest, Midwest and other northern states. 

The share of tests that detect the virus is a key indicator of whether the coronavirus is spreading or under control in a community. Public health officials want to see less than 3% of all tests return positive. An ideal rate is less than 1%, Fauci said

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COVID fuels eating disorders, family stress

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Ever wondered how or why someone is considered obese?

Buzz60

Pediatricians and public health experts predict a potentially dramatic increase in childhood obesity this year as months of pandemic eating, closed schools, stalled sports and public space restrictions extend indefinitely.

About one in seven children have met the criteria for childhood obesity since 2016, when the federal National Survey of Children’s Health changed its methodology, a report out Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found. 

While the percentage of children considered obese declined slightly in the last 10 years, it is expected to jump in 2020.

“We were making slow and steady progress until this,” said Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, a Northwestern University economist and professor. “It’s likely we will have wiped out a lot of the progress that we’ve made over the last decade in childhood obesity.”

The trend, already seen in pediatric offices, is especially concerning as

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Monmouth University ‘super-spreader event’ led to 125 Covid cases on New Jersey campus

A “super-spreader event” near Monmouth University led to positive coronavirus tests for more than 100 students and forced the school into all-online classes, officials said Tuesday.

The outbreak was traced to a single off-campus private gathering that resulted in 125 positive Covid-19 cases among the West Long Branch school’s nearly 5,700 pupils, Monmouth spokeswoman Tara Peters told NBC News.

The university would not specify what kind of event it was or when exactly it occurred, only saying it was a “social gathering” that happened roughly two weeks ago.

Before the outbreak, about two-thirds of fall classes were online, about a tenth were in-person and the rest were hybrid online/in-person, according to Peters. Now all classes are being held remotely.

“Our Health Services staff estimate that about 125 cases were connected to that event, either through attendance at the event or subsequent spreading to others by individuals in attendance,” Peters said,

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Covid reinfections are possible. Should we worry?

The patient walked into the Washoe County community testing station in the US state of Nevada on April 18 with a sore throat, dry cough and a headache, but no reason to worry.

He was only 25, had no prior medical conditions, and although the PCR nasal-swab test for Covid-19 he took came back positive, he was soon feeling well again.

Thirty five days later, he was rushed to the emergency room, short of breath and with a raging fever, and placed on oxygen support.

He had become the first confirmed US case of Covid-19 reinfection. 

Up to now, there have been only a handful of similar cases worldwide, and experts say it is too early to draw sweeping conclusions from such a small head count.

But the prospect of getting reinfected with Covid-19 — and getting even sicker the second time around — could have a significant impact on

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