The post-Ginsburg Supreme Court’s first abortion case

In the wake of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, millions of Americans wondered what the future of abortion access might look like. They won’t wait long to find out.

Any day now, the current eight-justice Supreme Court is expected to issue its first decision on abortion access. The case, Food and Drug Administration v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, considers abortion via pill and whether patients, in the midst of a deadly pandemic, should still be required to make an in-person trip to a doctor’s office in order to receive the medication. 

In front of the high court is whether to reverse lower courts’ preliminary injunctions that have temporarily suspended the FDA’s in-person rule.

Though the case doesn’t directly challenge Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide, it promises to alter the way patients access the procedure and offers a glimpse into

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A look at big issues on Supreme Court’s agenda in new term

Video: Kamala Harris addresses voters warning against Donald Trump’s supreme court appointment (The Independent)

Kamala Harris addresses voters warning against Donald Trump’s supreme court appointment

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will begin hearing arguments Monday after a summer break. Here are some of the issues either already on the court’s docket or likely to be before the justices soon:



President Donald Trump adjusts the microphone after he announced Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)


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President Donald Trump adjusts the microphone after he announced Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

HEALTH CARE

A week after the presidential election, the court will hear arguments in a bid by the Trump administration and Republican-led states to overturn the Obama-era health care law. Coverage for more than 20 million people is at stake, along with the

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U.S. Senator Tina Smith, Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan Emphasize U.S. Supreme Court’s Impact on Reproductive Health Care in Minnesota

The new Supreme Court will consider key cases that could take away Minnesotans’ health care coverage and threatens the right to abortion.

St. Paul, MN—  The recent vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court puts Minnesotans’ health care and reproductive rights in jeopardy. Today Senator Tina Smith, Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan, and leaders from Planned Parenthood and the ACLU had a discussion about the risks to Minnesotans if the Affordable Care Act or Roe v. Wade are overturned by the Supreme Court.

“Judge Barrett’s record of opposing the Affordable Care Act and Roe v. Wade demonstrates that she is not qualified to safeguard our constitutional rights and liberties as a member of our nation’s highest court,” said Senator Tina Smith. “Minnesotans are now facing a very real possibility of losing health care and reproductive rights. At a time when our country is grappling with entrenched health disparities and a pandemic, we

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Supreme Court’s potential tilt to the right could most affect issues of abortion, guns

WASHINGTON — If Congress confirms President Donald Trump’s nominee to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Supreme Court would become more conservative, and also perhaps more ready to tackle certain hot-button issues like abortion and guns. Chief Justice John Roberts would also likely become less able to steer the outcome in divisive cases.

Ginsburg, who died Sept. 18 at 87, was the leader of the liberal wing of the court, which had been split 5-4 between conservatives and liberals. Roberts had, on occasion, sided with the liberals. But if Trump fills Ginsburg’s seat, there will be six conservative justices, three of them appointed by him.

Here are several big issues that are poised to come before the justices where a more solidly conservative majority could make a difference:

Healthcare

A week after the presidential election, the court will hear arguments in bid by the Trump administration and Republican-led states to

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