Lives Lost: London rabbi worked to end community’s isolation

LONDON (AP) – Rabbi Avrohom Pinter gave his life to save his neighbors.

When the British government ordered a lockdown to slow the spread of coronavirus, Pinter went door-to-door in northeast London to deliver the public health warning to the ultra-Orthodox Jews in his community. Within days, the 71-year-old rabbi had caught COVID-19 and died.

His sacrifice was just the last chapter of a life spent forging links between the often-isolated community in Stamford Hill and wider British society, whether by working with an Anglican priest to build a community center or visiting the local mosque to grieve when a gunman killed 51 Muslims in New Zealand.

“He served as a bridge in a broader sense,″ said Chaya Spitz, a protege of Pinter’s and CEO of an umbrella organization for Orthodox Jewish charities. “What he did around COVID was typical of his approach more generally.”

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EDITOR’S NOTE: This is

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London rabbi worked to end community’s isolation

LONDON (AP) — Rabbi Avrohom Pinter gave his life to save his neighbors.



In this Dec. 20, 2017 photo provided by Joel Friedman, Rabbi Avrohom Pinter makes a speech at Canvey Island,in Essex, southeast England. Pinter gave his life to save his neighbors. When the British government ordered a lockdown to slow the spread of coronavirus, Pinter went door-to-door to deliver the public health warning to the ultra-Orthodox Jews in northeast London. Within days, the 71-year-old rabbi had caught the disease and died.  (Joel Friedman via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
In this Dec. 20, 2017 photo provided by Joel Friedman, Rabbi Avrohom Pinter makes a speech at Canvey Island,in Essex, southeast England. Pinter gave his life to save his neighbors. When the British government ordered a lockdown to slow the spread of coronavirus, Pinter went door-to-door to deliver the public health warning to the ultra-Orthodox Jews in northeast London. Within days, the 71-year-old rabbi had caught the disease and died. (Joel Friedman via AP)

When the British government ordered a lockdown to slow the spread of coronavirus, Pinter went door-to-door in northeast London to deliver the public health warning to the ultra-Orthodox Jews in his community. Within days, the 71-year-old rabbi had caught COVID-19 and died.

His sacrifice was just the last chapter of a life spent forging links between the

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Concerns over Brexit and covid are putting pressure on the farming community’s mental health

Nearly half of all calls made to its support helpline over the past four months have related to mental health, a farming help charity has reported.

Saturday, 10th October 2020, 4:45 pm

Pressures such as Brexit, extreme weather conditions and poor yields have impacted on farmer's mental health
Pressures such as Brexit, extreme weather conditions and poor yields have impacted on farmer’s mental health

The data revealed to mark today’s World Mental Health Day and next week’s Ag Mental Health Week, by the Farming Community Network (FCN), said mental health is now the most common factor in calls from members of the farming community.

These included stress and anxiety caused by issues including financial concerns, family relationship problems, Brexit uncertainty and the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Jude McCann, CEO of FCN, which runs the Farming Helpline, said the figures gave an “important insight” into the experiences of farmers throughout England and Wales

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MusiCares Launches ‘Wellness in Music’ Survey to Gauge Music Community’s Physical & Mental Health

The survey delves into a lot of personal areas, including the respondent’s alcohol, drug, tobacco and marijuana use. It also asks the respondents to reveal their age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, spiritual practice, income level, life satisfaction level, stress and anxiety level, health insurance status, how well they sleep and how often they exercise and meditate. Two areas it does not inquire about: the respondent’s sexual orientation or religious affiliation.

One section of the survey uses the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 test — a standardized test that helps to screen for depression.

MusiCares stresses that this is a voluntary survey and that all responses are strictly confidential. The survey is limited to those 18 and older and who have been working in the music industry for five or more years.

When the COVID-19 pandemic swept the U.S. in March, MusiCares established the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund to help music people

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Better Life Partners taps Bravado Health to help curb community’s opioid crisis

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla., Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Bravado Health recently announced a partnership with Better Life Partners to help achieve their goal of helping vulnerable populations achieve healthier lives.

Better Life Partners was created to help those with opioid use disorder (OUD) achieve lasting and meaningful recoveries. While COVID-19 has dominated the headlines for the past several months, it is important to remember that there is a very real and powerful opioid epidemic in this country as well. This crisis has worsened in recent years and projections indicate these drugs could kill more than half a million Americans in the next decade.

Although help is available, many suffering from OUD lack access to high-quality health care. Better Life Partners helps these individuals by offering a treatment program that combines the best evidence-based practices with a hyper-local, community-based delivery model. This approach, which can include prescription medications such

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Black community’s elevated stigma surrounding mental health issues rooted in history

SAN ANTONIO – Mental health issues are mounting in the wake of COVID-19, making it a priority discussion nationwide.

However, some racial groups are historically hesitant to seek help.

Local psychologist Dr. Eboney Jackson said the stigma of mental illness and seeking counseling is prevalent in the black community.

She said although it’s slowly getting better, the barriers are rooted in historical, structural racism.

For Jackson, breaking the stigma of mental healthcare in the black community comes from a very personal place.

“Many therapists and psychologists such as myself got into this field because we want people who look like us to know that it’s okay to get help, and maybe people are more comfortable seeing someone who looks like them,” she said.

Dr. Jackson wrote her whole dissertation on the subject. The reasons are expansive and she said they originate from institutional racism throughout history.

“Thinking about the Tuskegee

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