‘I’m a Black Doctor. I Feel the Weight of Representing My Community’

A distinct memory I have from my childhood in Sacramento, California is overhearing my dad taking calls from worried parents. He has been practicing as a general pediatrician for 25 years and answers every call with patience and compassion that I deeply admire.



Savatheda Fynes standing in front of a building: Rebekah Fenton was a pediatrics resident at Seattle Children's hospital before taking her current position as adolescent medicine fellow in Chicago.


© Rebekah Fenton
Rebekah Fenton was a pediatrics resident at Seattle Children’s hospital before taking her current position as adolescent medicine fellow in Chicago.

As I grew older, my father started sharing some of his patients’ stories with me and I began to realize that I also wanted to work in medicine, but that I wanted to focus my career on working with teenagers.

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However, as a Black girl growing up wanting to be a doctor, I became aware that I was the personification of my parents’ and communities’ dreams. At church or community events, I’d often hear, “your parents must be so proud.” And,

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Release of module and mapping of tools on stakeholder and community engagement in quality of care initiatives for maternal, newborn and child health

The WHO and UNICEF recently published a module to guide policy makers and programme implementers working in quality improvement in maternal, newborn and child health, to support making comprehensive and meaningful stakeholder and community engagement an integral part of quality improvement (QI) initiatives.

Orientation module

This module compliments the implementation guide developed by The Network for Improving Quality of care for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (QoC Network).  Four key topics are covered, including: rationale for engagement; building and
strengthening partnerships; strategies for information, communication and advocacy; and monitoring, evaluation and learning.

Mapping of tools

The mapping of tools identified 70 tools to further support implementation of stakeholder and community engagement across the seven steps of the Quality of Care Network’s Implementation Framework*. The
tools are available through an online portal, which allows uses to filter based on the different topic focus and phase of implementation. 

* 1) establish leadership

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Boston’s DIY Hip-Hop Community : NPR

Boston’s emerging do-it-yourself hip-hop community gives artists tremendous freedom.

Jesse Haley


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Jesse Haley

Boston’s emerging do-it-yourself hip-hop community gives artists tremendous freedom.

Jesse Haley

It’s 1986, and there’s a voice on the radio talking about a place called “Fresh Avenue.” “There’s a place yes a place to be / Where party people chill in harmony / No prejudice no crime or guns / Just the hip-hop and a lot of fun / I’m talking about the place Fresh Avenue / And I’m MC Keithy E from the Gang Starr Crew.”

You’ve heard drums before, but not quite like this. It’s the texture, the grit, the rawness — it draws you in. You’re like, “Bet, I’m there,” and, taking your hand off of the dial, you carefully listen for any new information about the place where you can experience this music live.

A few miles away, on

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COVID 19 Brings New Urgency to Health Outreach in NC Latino Community / Public News Service

Latinos and Black Americans comprise 55% of U.S. coronavirus cases, nearly double their population makeup, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data released in June. (Adobe Stock)

October 14, 2020

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As the coronavirus continues to affect North Carolina’s Latino communities, outreach workers are providing public health information, in Spanish and culturally relevant to this growing population.

Hector Salgado, community impact director for the American Heart Association in Charlotte, was spearheading an effort to raise awareness about heart health and blood-pressure monitoring among Latinos when the pandemic hit. With help from the Mecklenburg County Public Health Department and Blue Cross/Blue Shield, he said, the program pivoted to COVID-19 prevention. As the crisis worsened, Salgado said, he began to notice what he described as rampant misinformation in the Latino community.

“And those resources are not reflected,” he said. “I went to the farmer’s market and I saw

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At federal hearing, community outrage over plan to abandon Exide battery plant

LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 06: Portions of the Exide Technologies, lead-acid battery recycling plant located in Vernon are wrapped in white plastic even as a press conference with state and local elected leaders was held at Resurrection Church in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles to express their opposition to Exide's proposed bankruptcy settlement, specifically in regard to the option for Exide to fully abandon the facility in Vernon and its responsibility to clean the environmental damage it caused. Resurrection Church on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020 in Los Angeles, CA. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times
The closed Exide Technologies lead-acid battery recycling plant in Vernon is partially enclosed in plastic to prevent the release of lead and other contaminants. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Federal authorities faced an outpouring of community opposition at a public hearing Tuesday over an Exide Technologies bankruptcy plan to abandon a shuttered Vernon battery recycling plant blamed for spreading lead contamination across southeast L.A. County.

The near-universal indignation came from dozens of members of the predominantly Latino communities surrounding the closed Exide Technologies facility. One person after another during the hours-long hearing blasted the proposal and urged authorities to reject it and pursue actions to hold the company accountable for its pollution.

The U.S. Department of Justice and Environmental Protection Agency have agreed not to oppose the company’s plan, which is scheduled to be considered for approval at a bankruptcy court hearing Thursday.

“Accepting this terrible proposal would be

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How Voting Affects Fitness For You & Your Community, According To Instructors

With the 2020 elections just on the other side of this month, voting is top of mind for a lot of people. There’s a lot at stake in this election, and if you’re turning to fitness to sweat the stress away, you’re probably not the only one. But fitness and voting have even more to do with each other than you’d think.

Your access to workout spaces — whether that’s a local park with a track or a boutique studio — is fundamentally shaped by voting, says Nicole Cardoza, a yoga instructor and founder of Yoga Foster and the newsletter Anti-Racism Daily. “There are systemic issues perpetuated in the studios we hold dear and in the spaces that we occupy when we’re trying to be well,” Cardoza says. “So when we want to feel well in studios, it’s really about looking at that overarching system of racism and dismantling it.

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Public invited to address disparities among Black community in Washtenaw County

PITTSFIELD TOWNSHIP, MI — Activists and public officials will gather to discuss disparities among the Black community in Washtenaw County.

Activists will focus on five key areas at the ” Getting Real About Race” event, including housing, employment, education, health care and the criminal justice system in the county. It will run from 2-6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 17 at Lillie Park, 4365 Platt Road in Ann Arbor. Anyone interested is encouraged to register online.

“It’s one thing to know there’s a problem but there’s a whole other element to put some solutions in place. In Washtenaw County, we’ve been protesting, we have people of all different races coming together. While marching is definitely a part of it, we wanted individuals to know there’s another layer of work that needs to be done,” said Trische Duckworth, founder and executive director of Survivors Speak, a nonprofit leading the event.

Policing is

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Boston’s Kraft Center for Community Health Mobile Opioid Outreach Winnebago Reaches 10,000 Patients

BOSTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — To help combat the rise of opioid addiction, Winnebago Industries Specialty Vehicles collaborated with The Kraft Center for Community Health to help build a mobile medical clinic, Community Care in Reach, to better serve at-risk individuals in Boston. Since its deployment in January 2018, Community Care in Reach has made around 10,000 contacts and had nearly 1,400 total patient encounters. Seventy-five percent of Community Care in Reach’s clinical encounters represent follow-up visits by patients. The team has also distributed almost 3,000 overdose-reversing naloxone kits to individuals coping with opioid addiction.

Community Care in Reach was built by Winnebago Industries Specialty Vehicles using their Class C 423S Ford Transit-based platform with personalized modifications. The mobile health unit features a small waiting area, a patient exam room with all the medical equipment necessary to enable the vehicle and staff to act as

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Boston’s Kraft Center for Community Health Mobile Opioid Outreach Winnebago Reaches 10,000 Patients | News

BOSTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — To help combat the rise of opioid addiction, Winnebago Industries Specialty Vehicles collaborated with The Kraft Center for Community Health to help build a mobile medical clinic, Community Care in Reach, to better serve at-risk individuals in Boston. Since its deployment in January 2018, Community Care in Reach has made around 10,000 contacts and had nearly 1,400 total patient encounters. Seventy-five percent of Community Care in Reach’s clinical encounters represent follow-up visits by patients. The team has also distributed almost 3,000 overdose-reversing naloxone kits to individuals coping with opioid addiction.

Community Care in Reach was built by Winnebago Industries Specialty Vehicles using their Class C 423S Ford Transit-based platform with personalized modifications. The mobile health unit features a small waiting area, a patient exam room with all the medical equipment necessary to enable the vehicle and staff to act as

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Two potentially harmful chemicals found in groundwater at Maxie Park Community Center

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — The closure of the Maxie Park Community Center in Southwest Fresno is raising major concerns among staff and community members.

“Thousands of our community members have been in and out of that building over the past couple of years,” said Yolanda Randles the Executive Director of the West Fresno Resource Center, housed inside the community center. “Certainly there is a concern. I am concerned.”

Monday afternoon, City Council member and President Miguel Arias announced the discovery of two harmful chemicals in the Community Center’s groundwater.

Benzene, a known carcinogen, and Tetrachloroethylene, also known as PERC, is a chemical that can cause dizziness, nausea and even death if exposed to high amounts.

Arias says the water quality board found low traces of these chemicals during a routine check at a neighboring gas station.

“The water board suspected that contaminates originated from the old dry cleaner business,” he

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