Summit, Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine to Develop Saliva Tests for COVID, Head & Neck Cancer

AURORA, Colo., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Summit Biolabs, Inc., an early-stage molecular diagnostics company specializing in saliva-based testing for COVID-19 and head & neck cancer, and the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine (CCPM) at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus announced today a broad strategic collaboration involving research, development and commercialization of saliva liquid-biopsy tests for early cancer detection and diagnosis of COVID-19 and other viral contagions.

The CCPM holds one of the largest research biobanks in the United States with clinical data from more than 8.7 million de-identified patient records and plans to integrate the data with personalized genomic information.

“This partnership brings two innovative programs together to optimize COVID testing at a time when it’s desperately needed,” says Kathleen Barnes, Ph.D., Professor and Director of CCPM at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “Collaborations like this are crucial in moving research forward and

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Novant Health opens $165M cardiology, cancer care center

Novant Health opened a $165.9 million facility for outpatient cardiology and cancer care Oct. 12 in Charlotte, N.C. 

The seven-story, 260,000-square-foot facility houses both the Novant Health Claudia W. and John M. Belk Heart & Vascular Institute and the Agnes B. and Edward I. Weisiger Cancer Institute.

The new facility consolidates all the Winston-Salem, N.C.-based health sytem’s outpatient cardiac and cancer specialists, treatment services and support programs under one roof. 

“In the past, a patient may have had to walk as many as 7,000 steps in one day during their care journey from testing sites to clinics to a treatment center,” Gary Niess, MD, system physician executive of the Novant Health Belk Heart & Vascular Institute, said in a news release. “We’ll now be able to deliver the whole-journey care our patients need all in one place, saving those 7,000

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Finding breast cancer early through screening major tool for beating disease

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis in the United States. Dr. Srinath Sundararajan, an oncologist and hematologist with Texas Oncology-Katy, says early detection saves lives and that screening is important, even during the pandemic.

“Delaying cancer screenings will lead to detecting cancer at a later stage, and definitely that leads to more aggressive disease, more lengthy treatment and an increased healthcare cost,” Sundararajan said. “Cancer when identified early, there is a better chance of it being a curable cancer and better chance of having less intensive treatment. Screening cancer and finding it early is the single most effective way of improving cancer survival rates.”

He explained that since the 1980s, advances in breast cancer treatments have improved mortality rates, but screening has played a major role because it allows patients to seek treatment earlier in the disease.


While Sundararajan said mammograms are the main breast cancer detection

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Cancer takes heavy toll on women’s work, finances, study shows

Young women with cancer are at a high risk for employment and financial consequences, a new study finds.

“Our study addresses the burden of employment disruption and financial hardship among young women with cancer — a group who may be at particular risk for poor financial outcomes after cancer given their age and gender,” said researcher Clare Meernik, a fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

She and her colleagues surveyed more than 1,300 women in North Carolina and California a median of seven years after diagnosis. Their cancer was diagnosed when they were 15 to 39 years of age and working.

Following their diagnosis, 32% of the women had to stop working or cut back on their hours. Twenty-seven percent said they had to borrow money, go into debt or file for bankruptcy because of cancer treatment.

Women with disrupted employment were

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Local Health Plan Hosts Pink Stops in Breast Cancer Awareness Month Event

Local Health Plan Hosts Pink Stops in Breast Cancer Awareness Month Event

PR Newswire

RANCHO CUCAMONGA, Calif., Oct. 13, 2020

RANCHO CUCAMONGA, Calif., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Even in the face of COVID-19, the Inland Empire will continue Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, thanks to the American Cancer Society-Inland Empire.  To raise funds for breast cancer research, the organization has reimagined their annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5k event, transforming it into a socially safe Pink & Go Seek scavenger hunt. In support of this event, on October 17, Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP) will provide a $2,500 sponsorship and will host three Scavenger “Pink Stops” in the Inland Empire.

IEHP was a proud sponsor and participant at last year's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Event and is thrilled to continue participation at this year's reimagined and socially safe Pink & Go Seek scavenger hunt.IEHP was a proud sponsor and participant at last year's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Event and is thrilled to continue participation at this year's reimagined and socially safe Pink & Go Seek scavenger hunt.
IEHP was a proud sponsor and participant at last year’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Event and is thrilled to continue participation at this year’s reimagined and socially safe Pink & Go Seek scavenger hunt.

In

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Novant Health institutes for heart, vascular and cancer open new state-of-the-art facility

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Novant Health today announced its seven-story cardiovascular and cancer outpatient facility in the greater Charlotte market is complete. Officially named the Novant Health Claudia W. and John M. Belk Heart & Vascular Institute and Agnes B. and Edward I. Weisiger Cancer Institute, the $165.9 million, 260,000-square-foot investment consolidates all outpatient cardiac and cancer specialists, treatment services and support programs in one location. The building welcomed patients Monday, Oct. 12.

Aerial stills and video of facility

B-roll of facility

“Novant Health is proud to open the doors of this premier facility offering leading-edge treatments, groundbreaking clinical research and personalized, whole-person care for patients with cardiovascular conditions and cancer,” said Eric Eskioglu, MD, executive vice president and chief medical officer for Novant Health. “This is a historic moment for our entire Carolina community to celebrate.”

The medical journey for cardiac and cancer issues is often

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Balstilimab, Zalifrelimab Active in Advanced Cervical Cancer

Checkpoint blockade with the PD-1 inhibitor balstilimab, alone or in combination with the anti-CTLA-4 drug zalifrelimab, showed activity in women with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer, preliminary results from two phase II trials indicated.

In patients treated with balstilimab alone, the overall response rate (ORR) was 14%, including complete responses in 2%, reported David O’Malley, MD, of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in Columbus.

And in those who received both investigational agents — balstilimab plus zalifrelimab — the ORR increased to 22%, including complete responses in 6%.

“What is really interesting about the combination arm is that while we did see a median duration of response in the single-agent [arm] that was a very impressive 15 months, the duration of response has not been reached in the combination arm,” O’Malley told MedPage Today.

He said that the tripling of the complete response rate as well as the better

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Coronavirus left millions missing out on cancer screenings

Around 3 million people in the UK are thought to have missed out on cancer screening since the end of March, a report has revealed.

The coronavirus outbreak has triggered restrictions that leave many GPs only able to see patients with urgent symptoms.

Routine cancer screenings like smear tests, mammograms and bowel assessments were therefore put on hold, however, the programmes are beginning to restart.

Read more: Wash face coverings every day at 60C

A report by Cancer Research UK has revealed more than 350,000 people who would normally be urgently referred to hospital with suspected cancer symptoms missed out on that service, allowing their disease to become more advanced and difficult to treat.

While referrals have been steadily improving since April, they remain below pre-lockdown levels, leaving experts worried the restrictions that ward off the coronavirus may trigger a cancer crisis.

Gynecologist hand with latex glove with gynecological swab to take samples for cytologyto to prevent the cancer of papillomavirusGynecologist hand with latex glove with gynecological swab to take samples for cytologyto to prevent the cancer of papillomavirus

Many women missed out on cervical screening during

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‘Coronasomnia,’ prostate cancer, more latest health news

Health Matters Presented by SSM Health this week takes a look at some of the top medical stories impacting our lives these days. SLU Care General Internist Dr. Fred Buckhold at SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital helps us deal with all sorts of body aches and pains. Loretta Colvin at SSM Health St. Clare and St. Mary’s hospitals has some tips on how to beat “Coronasomnia” and get a good night sleep during this pandemic. SSM Health St. Clare urologist Dr. Patricia Heller updates us on the latest prostate cancer screening guidelines. And SLU Care cardiologist Dr. Michael Lim at SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital steers us toward some heart healthy food options.



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Here is a complete rundown of this week’s show:

Health Matters Presented by SSM Health– October 3, 2020

1. Dr. FRED BUCKHOLD, SLU

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11-year-old with rare cancer blogs to show good and bad sides of disease

When Nevaeh Williams was just 8, she was diagnosed with an extremely rare cancer. Doctors were unsure if she’d ever be cancer-free, but the treatment worked and she enjoyed two years playing softball, enjoying math class with friends and just being a kid. This August, a scan revealed the cancer had returned and her mom, Alana Simmons-Williams, was distraught.

“I’ve always had a little bit of anxiety when it would be time for scans but the anxiety was starting to ease,” Simmons-Williams, 34, who lives outside of Savannah, Georgia, told TODAY. “At her two-year scan (the doctor) told me the cancer came back. I was devastated, like heartbroken. I want to say it was worse than hearing it the first time.”

For two years, Nevaeh enjoyed life like any other child her age. But at recent scans, she and her family learned her rare cancer had returned. (Courtesy Nevaeh's Victory Against Cancer)For two years, Nevaeh enjoyed life like any other child her age. But at recent scans, she and her family learned her rare cancer had returned. (Courtesy Nevaeh's Victory Against Cancer)
For two years, Nevaeh enjoyed life like any other child her age. But at recent scans, she and her family learned her rare cancer had returned. (Courtesy Nevaeh’s Victory
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