Advancing Development Through Research in Nursing Education and Healthcare

Nursing education support is disappointingly low according to the National League for Nursing (NLN). In their own evaluation for their grant program, they studied the criteria used, procedures and projects submitted by the participating researchers. Their findings were detailed in their latest publication of Nursing Education’s Perspectives. The authors of this work saw that there were only limited scholarships available in nursing courses and that education is sadly lacking because there are not enough nursing instructors to adequately prepare future nurses to provide health care in a changing environment.

Professionals in the nursing field, Joanne R. Duffy, PhD, RN, FAAN, Marilyn Renn, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF and Barbara Patterson, PhD, RN, authored “Advancing Nursing Education Science: An Analysis of NLN’s Grant Program, 2008-2010”. They made an evaluation and analysis on the process for the awarding of the grant funds. They also made an in-depth investigation on the individual projects passed and the scores given by senior researchers who were part of the panel of judges.

As the main researchers for the grant program competed for the coveted funds, the authors were able to take note of their increased rigor over the three year period of three grant cycles. They also saw changes in the projects submitted that got more complex than the previous cycle. Their projects were conducted in many sites and their subjects varied. Their topics ranged in accordance to the need of the present time. The authors also observed that there was an increased motivation in principal researchers joining the project. The number of applicants was still good and the individual projects were of superb quality. The authors also remarked that the topics were more diverse and it addressed the pressing needs of the people of modern times.

To be able to help the scholars in their studies, information about the grant program was made available online by the program administrators. The process and evaluation were made transparent and accessible through web-based seminars and in instructional meetings conducted at the NLN’s yearly Education Summit. Web documents were publicly made available in the internet by NERAC after the criteria for evaluation was standardized in 2008. Having access to information about the program gives a better chance of success in winning the funds; funds which will be used to advance development in the nursing education and health care system. A good health care system ensures that quality patient care will be adequately served by nurses and medical personnel.